Archive | September 2013

Just for You ~ flower tutorial and more


Today I was surfing the net for some cool resources Tulips Talk readers might enjoy and found the Snapdragons blog with Jane Lindsey.

Jane has a wonderful flower tutorial with great instructions for putting flowers together.

Check it out here: http://snapdragongarden.co.uk/step%20by%20step_July.htm

While reading Jane’s blog I came across another blogger – Vintage Pretty

VP wrote a great article called “Heaven Scent”  (tips to keeping your house smelling fab) which you can read here: http://vintagepretty.org/2005/06/21/heaven-scent/

I also found a blog post by Anna Spiro, Interior Designer in Brisbane Australia and author of Absolutely Beautiful things that is just pretty to look at http://absolutelybeautifulthings.blogspot.com/ and even has some great flowers and things!

Be sure to order your cut flowers from Eden Florist to make your special bouquet.

Sympathy Flowers ARE Important


Confused about whether or not to send flowers to express your sympathy?

In the article “Avoiding Confusion” Kim Stacey says “The traditional funeral ritual plays a key role in the grieving process. As tradition has given way to new forms and behaviors, still the most common funeral-related ritual, is the sending, receiving and viewing of flowers.”

In a study entitled, “The Role of Flowers and Plants in the Bereavement Process,” funded jointly by the American Floral Endowment and the Society of American Florists Information Committee, more than half of the bereaved surveyed strongly agreed that flowers were a critical component of the funeral ritual that helped them deal with their grief.

She goes on to say, “At the funeral service, flowers also help brighten a somber environment and provide a topic of conversation and a tranquil focal point.”

More important than the role of flowers in keeping conversation going, the study further demonstrated that because of their soothing qualities, sympathy flowers displayed at funerals actually had a positive impact on the emotional well-being of the bereaved.

After the funeral service, arrangements and plants act as keepsakes to brighten the home and in the case of flowering plants, can serve as a living memorial to the deceased. Not only that, caring for the plants can provide hours of pleasure and an emotional connection to the missing loved one.”

To read the rest of the article, visit: http://www.funeralwire.com/features/feature.php?id=60

To send flowers to show your sympathy and condolences, visit Eden Florist today.

Lavender Beef with Peppercorns


It’s amazing all the herbs and flowers you can cook with.  Here ia a recipe I found for beef tenderloin with lavender and peppercorns. Try it. It is really good.

1 (3- to 4-pound) beef tenderloin roast
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoons whole black peppercorns
1 tablespoons whole white peppercorns
2 tablespoons fennel seeds
1 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
2 tablespoons dried culinary lavender flowers

Bring roast to room temperature before cooking. Trim the tenderloin of fat and silverskin.  Note: Silverskin is the silvery-white connective tissue. It doesn’t dissolve when the tenderloin is cooked, so it needs to be trimmed away.

Pat the beef dry with paper towels. Lightly oil outside of roast.

In a small spice or coffee grinder, coarsely grind the black peppercorns, white peppercorns, fennel seeds, thyme, and lavender flowers; rub mixture all over the meat. Wrap tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 2 hours or overnight (preferably).

Preheat oven to 425°F. Unwrap roast and place onto a rack in a shallow baking pan, tucking the thin end under to make it as thick as the rest of the roast. Place roast onto a rack in a shallow baking pan, tucking the thin end under to make it as thick as the rest of the roast. Roast for 15 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 325°F and continue to roast until the internal temperature reaches desired temperature on a meat thermometer (see below).
Rare – 120°F
Medium Rare – 125°F
Medium – 130°F

Remove from oven and transfer onto a cutting board; let stand 15 minutes before carving (meat temperature will rise 5 to 10 degrees after it is removed from the oven).

Transfer onto a serving platter and serve immediately with any accumulated juices.

Makes 6 to 8 servings.

Source: http://whatscookingamerica.net/Beef/lavenderbeef.htm

For a complete list of edible flowers, Check out the Edible Flower Chart at Eden Florist.

Check out Notes From the Universe


A flower doesn’t turn toward the sun because it needs to, but because it wants to, and so the process is effortless and joyful. ~ the universe.

Every day I receive a wonderful “note from the Universe.” It is called TUT™ and they are “Brief passages written by ‘The Universe,’ designed to remind you that you have, indeed, been given dominion over all things.”

You can learn more and subscribe at www.Tut.com.

And be sure to send flowers to someone you love, with your favorite note from the universe tucked in!

How To can Enjoy the Physical and Emotional Benefits of Flowers


red roseIncrease energy with red roses
Since red has the slowest vibratory rate and and longest wavelength, it stimulates adrenal glands, boosting energy.
blue purple irisBoost confidence with irises
The color indigo stimulates the brain’s pineal gland, which is the regulator of sleep patterns. Indigo also helps to free the mind of worries, fear and inhibition.
sunflowersEnhance alertness with sunflowers
Yellow lightwaves stimulate the brain, making you alert, clearheaded and decisive. And since we associate yellow with the sun’s rays and daylight, it’s said to help us feel more optimistic.
bluebellsGet a good night’s sleep with bluebells
Blue triggers the production of melotonin, a brain chemical that helps us relax and sleep soundly. Blue also stimulates the thyroid gland to release thyroxin, a hormone that regulates metabolic rate.
green zinniasRelax with green zinnias
Green affects the nervous system, making us breathe slowly and deeply, slowing the production of stress hormones and helping the heart relax.
orange gerbera daisyPrevent allergies with orange daisies
Orange strengthens the immune system and the lungs, which can ward off spring allergies. Orange also has a strong beneficial effect on the digestive system and can stimulate the sexual organs.
purple irisRelieve stress with lilacs
Violet cools us, alleviating “hot” conditions like heat rash and sunburn, and suppressing hunger and balancing metabolism. It also stimulates the pituitary gland, the part of the brain that releases tension-fighting beta-endorphins.
(source: ©Society of American Florists)

Flowers Equals Happiness Part One


This article published by Society of American Florists about a study conducted by Rutgers University reveals that flowers do indeed equal happiness:
natures glory floral arrangement equals happinessScience And Nature Unearth New Insights Into Emotional Health – Rutgers Behavioral Study Links Flowers And Life Satisfaction

With today’s high-tech and fast-paced lifestyle taking its daily toll on our lives, experts advise exercise and other personal lifestyle changes to relieve stress. According to recent behavioral research conducted at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, nature provides us with a simple way to improve emotional health – flowers. The presence of flowers triggers happy emotions, heightens feelings of life satisfaction and affects social behavior in a positive manner far beyond what is normally believed.
“What’s most exciting about this study is that it challenges established scientific beliefs about how people can manage their day-to-day moods in a healthy and natural way,” said Jeannette Haviland-Jones, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology at Rutgers and lead researcher on the study.
Research Findings
A team of researchers explored the link between flowers and life satisfaction in a 10-month study of participants’ behavioral and emotional responses to receiving flowers. The results show that flowers are a natural and healthful moderator of moods.
Flowers have an immediate impact on happiness. All study participants expressed “true” or “excited” smiles upon receiving flowers, demonstrating extraordinary delight and gratitude. This reaction was universal, occurring in all age groups.
Flowers have a long-term positive effect on moods. Specifically, study participants reported feeling less depressed, anxious and agitated after receiving flowers, and demonstrated a higher sense of enjoyment and life satisfaction.
Flowers make intimate connections. The presence of flowers led to increased contact with family and friends.
“Common sense tells us that flowers make us happy,” said Dr. Haviland-Jones. “Now, science shows that not only do flowers make us happier than we know, they have strong positive effects on our emotional well being.”
Forget the fountain of youth, new scientific research proves flowers help senior citizens cope with the challenges of aging.
Sharing Space
The study also explored where in their homes people display flowers. The arrangements were placed in areas of the home that are open to visitors – such as foyers, living rooms and dining rooms – suggesting that flowers are a symbol for sharing.
Flowers bring about positive emotional feelings in those who enter a room,” said Dr. Haviland-Jones. “They make the space more welcoming and create a sharing atmosphere.
Background
The Emotional Impact of Flowers Study was conducted by Jeannette M. Haviland-Jones, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology, Project Director, Human Development Lab at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. Dr. Haviland-Jones is a psychologist and internationally recognized authority in the role of emotional development in human behavior and nonverbal emotional signals and response.
The research adds a scientific foundation to what many consider to be common knowledge – that flowers have a strong, beneficial impact on those who receive them. The Society of American Florists worked in cooperation with the Rutgers research team, bringing an expertise of flowers to the project.
Flower Therapy
The researchers from Rutgers determined that the flower recipients in the study experienced an elevation in mood that lasted for days. And Chinese healers – who’ve long believed in “flower power” – say that it doesn’t stop there. They say you can utilitze flowers to summon whatever power or emotion you’d like – and that the secret is in the flower’s color. Each color creates a different frequency of lightwaves, they believe, which travel through the retina and down the optic nerve, setting off a chain reaction of responses in the body. Neurotransmitters are then released, inducing the production of calming hormones like melotonin, stimulating hormones like adrenaline, and mood-boosting hormones like serotonin.

In Part Two we will share how you can enjoy the physical and emotional benefits of flowers.

(source: ©Society of American Florists)