Carrying over the Threshold and Other Wedding Traditions


! Tying Shoes to the Back of the Car ~ This custom dates back to the Egyptians (again!). They would often exchange or trade their sandals when the possession was passed on to another. Therefore, when the father “gave” his daughter to the groom, he would also give him his sandals. Later the Romans would shower the happy couple with shoes as they left the ceremony. Thank goodness for cars, because today the custom is tying shoes to the back of a car as a symbol of good luck.
! Carrying the Bride Over the Threshold ~ Romans believed that if a bride stumbled when she entered her new home, it would be a sign that bad luck and a doomed marriage were inevitable. Carrying the bride over the threshold would prevent this from happening.
! The Weather ~ Some say that when it rains on your wedding day it will bring unhappiness, bad luck and tears. Other beliefs are that rain brings good wishes and will wash away all the couple’s troubles and woes.
! Marry on Monday ~ Some couples even believe that certain days of the week bring more luck than others and they will even consult an astrologer for advice on the best day to marry. This custom dates back to ancient China.
! Proposals on February 29 (Leap Year) ~ This dates back hundreds of years to Medieval England. According to English law, February 29 was not recognized as a real day and therefore it was “leapt over” or ignored. Since it was not a real day, it was assumed that traditions had no real status. Therefore, women who worried about never marrying took advantage of this “loophole” and did the proposing.
“Yes, is only the Beginning.” If you are planning a wedding this is the perfect Wedding planner for you – and it’s FREE!  Just leave a comment below and WE will email you the link to grab it.

weddingpic! Tying Shoes to the Back of the Car ~ This custom dates back to the Egyptians (again!). They would often exchange or trade their sandals when the possession was passed on to another. Therefore, when the father “gave” his daughter to the groom, he would also give him his sandals. Later the Romans would shower the happy couple with shoes as they left the ceremony. Thank goodness for cars, because today the custom is tying shoes to the back of a car as a symbol of good luck.

! Carrying the Bride Over the Threshold ~ Romans believed that if a bride stumbled when she entered her new home, it would be a sign that bad luck and a doomed marriage were inevitable. Carrying the bride over the threshold would prevent this from happening.

! The Weather ~ Some say that when it rains on your wedding day it will bring unhappiness, bad luck and tears. Other beliefs are that rain brings good wishes and will wash away all the couple’s troubles and woes.

! Marry on Monday ~ Some couples even believe that certain days of the week bring more luck than others and they will even consult an astrologer for advice on the best day to marry. This custom dates back to ancient China.

! Proposals on February 29 (Leap Year) ~ This dates back hundreds of years to Medieval England. According to English law, February 29 was not recognized as a real day and therefore it was “leapt over” or ignored. Since it was not a real day, it was assumed that traditions had no real status. Therefore, women who worried about never marrying took advantage of this “loophole” and did the proposing.

Excerpt from: “Yes, is only the Beginning.” If you are planning a wedding this is the perfect Wedding planner for you – and it’s FREE!  Just leave a comment below and WE will email you the link to grab it.

When choosing flowers for you wedding in South Florida be sure to give Eden Florist a call at 954-981-5515 or 800-966-3336, the shop voted BEST Florist in Broward County by the Herald 5 years in a row.  And Top Three florist in South Florida by WSVN Channel 7!

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  1. Pingback: carrying over the threshold and other wedding traditions | Tulips Talk | Tulips Flowers

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