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Florascope for The Zodiak Sign Cancer


Cancer: Jun. 22 – Jul. 22

"Florascope for the Zodiak sign of Cancer"People born under the Zodiak sign of Cancer are often considered an emotional, incurable romantics. Sociable, loving and patient, their generous spirit, cancereans are sensitive and thoughtful. They tend to take everything to heart and are drawn to people who wish to unburden themselves vocally.

You can cry on a Cancer’s shoulder, talk their ear off, share your own burdens and they will react with compassion and thoughtfulness. Cancer’s tend to be home-bodies and create a loving nurturing environment for those they care about and for.

Cancer personalities love larkspur, delphinium, or white lilies. A bouquet of white roses will touch their heart and express the perfect sentiment you wish to convey

Cancers colors sea green, silver and cerulean blue and their birthstone is the pearl.

 

 

Meet the Desert Rose


"Meet the Desert Rose"Name: Desert Rose Cactus

Family: Crassulaceae (Echeveria)

Meaning: Endurance, fortitude

Common Names: Pinwheel Desert Rose, Irish Rose

History:

The word cactus is derived from the Greek word “Kaktos” and refers to a plant with spiny thistles on it. It has also been referred to as the “Mother-in-law’s Cushion”. The Desert Rose is a water-storing, evergreen perennial with tight rosettes that come in a variety of colors and are predominantly available in the winter and spring. The spoon-shaped leaves look like flower petals, which resemble a rose are native to semi-desert areas of Central America, from Mexico to north-western South America.

Because of its nature to withstand the test of time, the cactus symbolizes endurance and longevity.

The Desert Rose makes a perfect desktop gift for an office.

Flowers and Their Meaning: The Poppy


"Meaning and History of the Poppy"

Poppy – Meaning: “Wealth and Success”

Botanical Name: Bocconia    Family: Papaveraceae

We are slumberous Poppies,
Lords of Lethe downs,
Some awake and some asleep,
Sleeping in our crowns.
What perchance our dreams may know,
Let our serious beauty show.

There are many kinds of poppy, including California poppies, Iceland poppies, and perennial poppies. Red poppies symbolize fantastic extravagance. On the other hand, yellow poppies stand for wealth and success. White ones can convey forgetfulness and sleep.  Poppy is among the most loved flowers. These plants generally bloom during the spring and early summer.

The field poppy was grown by the ancient Egyptians.

The poppy plant was sacred to Ceres, the Roman goddess of grain. She was often depicted wearing wearing a wreath made of the blooms and carrying corn, which she would offer as a sacrifice to the Gods.  The poppy has been called many names such as Thunder flower. The myth is that when children would pick the flower, the petals would fall and they would then be struck by Thunder.  One of the old country names was Cheesebowl because there is a little round bowl in the bottom of the flower’s head, filled with seeds set in something that resembles cheese. The poppy has also been associated with fertility, and represented the blood of dead warriors. Because of the its strong smell, it has even been called the headache flower.

When you need flowers, remember Eden Florist & Gift Baskets
Note: the header image for this blog is a field of poppies

History and Meaning of Iris


"History and Meaning of Iris"With a history that dates back to the times of Greek Gods and Goddesses, means “rainbow,” Named for the Goddess of love,  The sacred Iris was considered the symbol of communication and messages.

The Iris is from the Iridaceae Family

Symbolism and Language of Flowers: Faith, Wisdom, Hope, Valor,  admiration and Eloquence

France and Florence (Italy) both chose the Iris as their emblem. The Iris is the basis for the fleur-de-lis, one of the most well-known symbols in the world and the symbol of the French Royal Family. Tennessee has also adopted the Iris as the official state flower.

Iris is a garden flower, grown from a bulb with long, flat leaves. With over 200 varieties, Iris come white, yellow,  shades of blues and purples, pink and orange, brown and red, and even black.

Some varieties of iris grow in deserts, some in swamps, some in colder climates and many others in temperate climates.

The Iris was also considered a favorite flower of the Muslems who took it to Spain after their conquest in the 8th century.

Irises are grown from bulbs or rhizomes and have long, flat leaves. Irises are used extensively in gardens, especially the bearded varieties. Irises are  hardy herbaceous perennials that are easy to cultivate. Irises can be found growing in North America, Asia, Northern Africa, Europe and the Middle East.

Iris Facts and Trivia:

Iris roots are used to treat skin diseases. The juice of Irises are also sometimes used as a cosmetic treatment for the removal of freckles.

The Iris is known as Tze Hu-tieh or “The Purple Butterfly” because it reminds the Chinese people of butterfly wings, flapping gently in the breeze.

Purple irises were planted over the graves of women to summon the Goddess to guide the dead on their journey.

Ancient Egyptian kings were enthralled by the iris’s exotic nature. Evidence can be found in the drawings of the flower in a number of Egyptian palaces and historic structures.

During the Middle Ages the Fleur-de-lis was adopted as the recognized national symbol of France.

The Iris has been used to make perfume and as a medicinal remedy.

 

Iris, Most Beautiful Flower

Iris, most beautiful flower,
Symbol of life, love, and light;
Found by the brook, and the meadow,
Or lofty, on arable height.
You come in such glorious colors,
In hues, the rainbow surpass;
The chart of color portrays you,
In petal, or veins, of your class.
You bloom with the first in Winter,
With the last, in the Fall, you still show;
You steal the full beauty of Springtime,
With your fragrance and sharp color glow.
Your form and beauty of flower,
An artist’s desire of full worth;
So Iris, we love you and crown you,
MOST BEAUTIFUL FLOWER ON EARTH!

Edith Buckner Edwards

 

Christmas Facts and Symbols


mistletoe

Mistletoe and Holly
Two hundred years before the birth of Christ, the Druids used mistletoe to celebrate the coming of winter. They would gather this evergreen plant that is parasitic upon other trees and used it to decorate their homes. They believed the plant had special healing powers for everything from female infertility to poison ingestion. Scandinavians also thought of mistletoe as a plant of peace and harmony. They associated mistletoe with their goddess of love, Frigga. The custom of kissing under the mistletoe probably derived from this belief. The early church banned the use of mistletoe in Christmas celebrations because of its pagan origins. Instead, church fathers suggested the use of holly as an appropriate substitute for Christmas greenery.

Poinsettia

 

Poinsettias
Poinsettias are native to Mexico. They were named after America’s first ambassador to Mexico, Joel Poinsett. He brought the plants to America in 1828. The Mexicans in the eighteenth century thought the plants were symbolic of the Star of Bethlehem. Thus the Poinsettia became associated with the Christmas season. The actual flower of the poinsettia is small and yellow. But surrounding the flower are large, bright red leaves, often mistaken for petals.

 

The Christmas Tree
christmastreeThe Christmas Tree originated in Germany in the 16th century. It was common for the Germanic people to decorate fir trees, both inside and out, with roses, apples, and colored paper. It is believed that Martin Luther, the Protestant reformer, was the first to light a Christmas tree with candles. While coming home one dark winter’s night near Christmas, he was struck with the beauty of the starlight shining through the branches of a small fir tree outside his home. He duplicated the starlight by using candles attached to the branches of his indoor Christmas tree. The Christmas tree was not widely used in Britain until the 19th century. It was brought to America by the Pennsylvania Germans in the 1820’s.

Is there someone in your family that you just have trouble getting the right gift for? If so, check out Heidi’s Top Ten Gifts for the Hard to Please ~ http://www.edenflorist.com/article_info.php?articles_id=22

Meaning and History of Calendula


Calendula ~ Admiration, Good Luck

 "Meaning and History of Calendula"(wor calendae,  pot marigold) ~ Means “Winning Grace”  and “throughout the months.”

The name Calendula stems from the Latin kalendae, meaning first day of the month, presumably because pot marigolds are in bloom at the start of most months of the year.” ( wikipedia.com )  Historically Known for its medicinal and culinary value, the calendula was called  “Mary’s Gold” by Early Christians.  The would place calendula by the statues of the Virgin Mary to honor her.  The most sacred of flowers of ancient India, calendula were strung into garlands to adorn holy statues.


A member of the marigold family, calendula is traditionally known as an herb as well as valued for its medicinal and culinary uses. In ancient times, calendula blossoms were mixed in wine to relieve indigestion. Calendula petals were used in ointments to heal skin irritations, jaundice, sore eyes, and toothaches.  It is used to stimulate blood circulation and lower fevers (by causing sweating). It can also be used to treat diaper rash, as it promotes rapid healing. Calendula oil can be used to treat earaches, is a natural antiseptic and even helps heal hemmoroids.

The Romans used calendula mixed with vinegar to season their meat and salad dishes.


A Mediterranean annual plant (Calendula officinalis) in the composite family, widely cultivated for its showy, yellow or orange, rayed flower heads that were formerly used in medicine, coloring, and flavoring of food.

 

Calendula is also October’s Birth flower and the International Herb Association declared calendula flower of the year for 2008. Calendula has great anti-inflammatory properties and vulnerary properties. Its uses are varied — from soothing minor skin disorders like pimples and dry chapped lips to curing chicken pox etc.


Check out Aromatherapy at Home ezine for a recipe to make Calendula Oil