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Valentine’s Day Trivia and Facts 2015


Did you know?

More than 100 million roses are sold at Valentine’s Day. Of cut flower purchases, Valentine’s Day ranks #1, "Valentine's Day Trivia and Facts 2015 Thats Amore"making it the number one holiday for many florists.

Of Valentine’s floral purchases, 64% are made by men and 36% by women. What are they buying?

78% Cut flowers
15% Flowering houseplants
5% Outdoor bedding and garden plants
2% Green plants
Of cut flowers purchased, 45% are roses, 34% mixed flowers, 13% carnations, and 8% other single flower types. Of roses purchased, 74% are red, 10% pink, 5% peach/salmon, 3% yellow, 2% white, 4% mixed colors, 2% other. For whom are they buying?
Men:
84% wife/significant other
4% friend
5% mother
3% daughter
5% other
Women:
24% mother
19% husband/significant other
13% daughter
14% self
12% friend
6% parents
2% grandmother
1% sister
9% other

Source: Society of American Florists Survey results are from a nationwide survey of 481 men and 534 women conducted by Bruskin/Goldring Research

love

Love is very patient and kind,
never jealous or envious,
never boastful or proud,
never haughty or selfish or rude.
Love does not demand its own way.
It is not irritable or touchy.
It does not hold grudges
and will hardly even notice
when others do it wrong.
It is never glad about injustice,
but rejoices whenever truth wins out.
If you love someone you
will be loyal to him
no matter what the cost.
You will always believe in him,
Always expect the best of him
and always stand your ground
in defending him.
All the special gifts
and powers from God
will someday come to an end,
but love goes on forever.
Living Bible I Corinthians 13:4-8

Read more at: Valentines Traditions Around the World and  Even More Valentine Traditions Around the World

(Pictured: That’s Amore Vase Arrangement of Roses and Lilies)

 

Giving Thanks Around the world


"Give thanks around the wordl"Throughout history mankind has celebrated the bountiful harvest withTthanksgiving ceremonies.

Before the establishment of formal religions many ancient farmers believed that their crops contained spirits which caused the crops to grow and die. Many believed that these spirits would be released when the crops were harvested and they had to be destroyed or they would take revenge on the farmers who harvested them. Some of the harvest festivals celebrated the defeat of these spirits.

Harvest festivals and thanksgiving celebrations were held by the ancient Greeks, the Romans, the Hebrews, the Chinese, and the Egyptians.

The Greeks

The ancient Greeks worshipped many gods and goddesses. Their goddess of corn (actually all grains) was Demeter who was honored at the festival of Thesmosphoria held each autumn.

On the first day of the festival married women (possibility connecting childbearing and the raising of crops) would build leafy shelters and furnish them with couches made with plants. On the second day they fasted. On the third day a feast was held and offerings to the goddess Demeter were made – gifts of seed corn, cakes, fruit, and pigs. It was hoped that Demeter’s gratitude would grant them a good harvest.

The Romans

The Romans also celebrated a harvest festival called Cerelia, which honored Ceres their goddess of corn (from which the word cereal comes). The festival was held each year on October 4th and offerings of the first fruits of the harvest and pigs were offered to Ceres. Their celebration included music, parades, games and sports and a thanksgiving feast.

The Chinese

The ancient Chinese celebrated their harvest festival, Chung Ch’ui, with the full moon that fell on the 15th day of the 8th month. This day was considered the birthday of the moon and special “moon cakes”, round and yellow like the moon, would be baked. Each cake was stamped with the picture of a rabbit – as it was a rabbit, not a man, which the Chinese saw on the face of the moon.

The families ate a thanksgiving meal and feasted on roasted pig, harvested fruits and the “moon cakes”. It was believed that during the 3 day festival flowers would fall from the moon and those who saw them would be rewarded with good fortune.

According to legend Chung Ch’ui also gave thanks for another special occasion. China had been conquered by enemy armies who took control of the Chinese homes and food. The Chinese found themselves homeless and with no food. Many staved. In order to free themselves they decided to attack the invaders.

The women baked special moon cakes which were distributed to every family. In each cake was a secret message which contained the time for the attack. When the time came the invaders were surprised and easily defeated. Every year moon cakes are eaten in memory of this victory.

The Hebrews

Jewish families also celebrate a harvest festival called Sukkoth. Taking place each autumn, Sukkoth has been celebrated for over 3000 years.

Sukkoth is know by 2 names – Hag ha Succot – the Feast of the Tabernacles and Hag ha Asif – the Feast of Ingathering. Sukkoth begins on the 15th day of the Hebrew month of Tishri, 5 days after Yom Kippur, the most solemn day of the Jewish year.

Sukkoth is named for the huts (succots) that Moses and the Israelites lived in as they wandered the desert for 40 years before they reached the Promised Land. These huts were made of branches and were easy to assemble, take apart, and carry as the Israelites wandered through the desert.

When celebrating Sukkoth, which lasts for 8 days, the Jewish people build small huts of branches which recall the tabernacles of their ancestors. These huts are constructed as temporary shelters, as the branches are not driven into the ground and the roof is covered with foliage which is spaced to let the light in. Inside the huts are hung fruits and vegetables, including apples, grapes, corn, and pomegranates. On the first 2 nights of Sukkoth the families eat their meals in the huts under the evening sky.

The Egyptians

The ancient Egyptians celebrated their harvest festival in honor of Min, their god of vegetation and fertility. The festival was held in the springtime, the Egyptian’s harvest season.

The festival of Min featured a parade in which the Pharaoh took part. After the parade a great feast was held. Music, dancing, and sports were also part of the celebration.

When the Egyptian farmers harvested their corn, they wept and pretended to be grief-stricken. This was to deceive the spirit which they believed lived in the corn. They feared the spirit would become angry when the farmers cut down the corn where it lived.

(source:beamto.com)

National Make Someone Smile Week Begins Today


“The man who can smile when things go wrong has thought of someone else he can blame it on.” ~ Robert Bloch

Did you know that today begins National Make Someone Smile WEEK (July 20-16? That’s right. And all across the country thousands of florists are delivering flowers to people in hospitals, nursing homes, and foster care centers to people who might not otherwise get any flowers.

Started in 2000 by Teleflora, it has become “the floral industry’s most successful charitable program. Last year’s program spanned 144 cities throughout the United States and Canada, more than 2,000 florists donated their time. Teleflora’s program delivered more than 35,000 bouquets to those most in need of a smile.”

Eden Florist will be participating in Make Someone Smile Week by dropping off flowers to my local library, favorite grocery store clerk and more.

Check out the article “How do you Make Someone Smile? Send Flowers, of course!”   It’s my list of  21 people and places to send a smile and get on in return.  and be sure to visit: EdenFlorist.com to send flowers to someone who needs a lift.

And when you give a smile, it is almost impossible not to get one in return! And wouldn’t it be nice to be “blamed” for doing something good (for a change)? *SMILE

So keep smiling! And be sure to send someone flowers to make them smile too!  It could be a total stranger or someone you love. Its up to you.

Feel free to leave your LIST of people you would like to make smile in the comments section below. If we get enough response, I may even have a contest and give free flowers to the writer AND the person she/he wishes to send flowers. How about that to make someone smile?

Happy Make Someone Smile Week!

Today is Cherry Blossom Day


Today is Cherry Blossom Day ~ On March 27, 1912, 1st Lady Taft and Viscountess Chinda, wife of the Japanese ambassador planted a cherry tree on the bank of the Tidal Basin. This started a hundred plus year tradition in Washington D.C. known as the Cherry Blossom Festival. Over the next 7 years more than 3,000 trees were planted which had been grafted from trees on the bank of the Arakawa River in Adachi Ward (Tokyo). Cherry Treas are one of the most prominent symbols of the U.S. capital today. In fact, visitors from around the globe travel to Washington, D.C. every spring to see the Cherry trees in bloom

 
Cherry blossoms can be used in teas such as Sachura Tea (made by pouring hot water over a salted cherry blossom, or in teabags containing dried flowers), deserts such as Sachura Mochi (filled with anko, or sweetened red bean paste) and as flavorings for other foods.

Cherry blossoms are a popular adornment for floral decor and used by florists everywhere.

VALENTINE TRIVIA


 

"VALENTINE TRIVIA"

My Heart is Yours Bouquet

Medieval Europeans believed birds mated on February 14th.73% of U.S. men buy flowers on Valentine’s Day.15% of U.S. women send themselves flowers on Valentine’s Day.Queen Victoria sent over 2,500 Valentine’s during her reign.

The Welsh used to give each other wooden spoons on February 14th. During the nineteenth century, romantic Brits would simply pick the first person they say on February 14th to be their Valentine.Finns celebrate Valentine’s Day by being nice to their friends.

To learn more about Valentine’s Day, take the Quiz!!

 

How New Year is Said Around the World


happy new year

Arabic: Kul ‘aam u antum salimoun

Brazilian: Boas Festas e Feliz Ano Novo means “Good Parties and Happy New Year”

Chinese: Chu Shen Tan

Czechoslavakia: Scastny Novy Rok

Dutch: Gullukkig Niuw Jaar

Finnish: Onnellista Uutta Vuotta

French: Bonne Annee

German: Prosit Neujahr

Greek: Eftecheezmaenos o Kaenooryos hronos

Hebrew: L’Shannah Tovah Tikatevu

Hindi: Niya Saa Moobaarak

Irish (Gaelic): Bliain nua fe mhaise dhuit

Italian: Buon Capodanno

Khmer: Sua Sdei tfnam tmei

Laotian: Sabai dee pee mai

Polish: Szczesliwego Nowego Roku

Portuguese: Feliz Ano Novo

Russian: S Novim Godom

Serbo-Croatian: Scecna nova godina

Spanish: Feliz Ano Neuvo  and Prospero Ano Nuevo

Turkish: Yeni Yiliniz Kutlu Olsun

Vietnamese: Cung-Chuc Tan-Xuan

Want to translate something? Check out www.FreeTranslation.com.

Order flowers for New Years, in January or anytime at www.EdenFlorist.com