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Florascope for Gemini


Gemini: May 22 – Jun. 21

Gemini’s symbol is the twins.  Geminis are versatile, highly adaptable and somewhat mysterious. Gemini are playful, youthful and fun-loving. Bordering on the mischievous, Geminis are expressive, clever and social.

You can choose narcissus or buttercup, roses or poppy. Lady Gemini like almost every flower and her preferences depend on her mood, that changes very quickly.

Geminis delight in fun loving, cheerful flowers such as daisies, gerberas, summery sunflowers or quiet sophistication of the rose.  Geminis like nearly every flower so match the flower to the ever changing mood of the creative, lighthearted Gemini, are one of the most creative of all the zodiac signs. Roses are a perfect choice with the range of colors that symbolize friendship. love and even passion.

Geminis colors are bright yellow, black and white and their birthstone is agate.

Today is Plant a Flower Day… In Honor of Earth Day


"Today is Earth Day and Plant a Flower Day"

“Flowers are good for the Earth AND for the Soul” Heidi Richards Mooney

Remember when you were a school girl (or boy as the case may be) and your teacher gave you a project of planting a seed in a paper cup? I do, I think the first time we did that was in 1st grade and the nuns (did I mention I’m a recovering Catholic? *SMILE) gave each student a paper cup, and some seeds which I don’t even recall what they were. We marched outside to the school yard, hoes in hand and began digging up the earth so we could put the dirt in our humble paper cups, add seeds, a little water and then wait.  We waited for what seemed like eternity (probably only a few days in adult time) as the paper cups sprouted little green leaves.  I remember how proud I was of that little plant… that I (and God) could actually create a living thing!  In fact, it is probably the only good memory I have of Catholic School.  This is, I am sure what started my love, awe and respect for flowers.

 

According to the National Gardening Association, gardening is one of the nation’s most popular pastimes. One in four Americans says that gardening is a real hobby or interest of theirs. About one in four spends four or more hours per week tending lawns, flowers, and vegetables.  It makes me wonder how it is around the world? In some parts the numbers are probably much higher!

 

It got me thinking about how flowers affect us in such profound ways. 

In Honor of Earth Day and Plant a Flower day….. Here’s a story Gloria Mount shared on the WIN network on RYZE Social network shared about how flowers have impacted her life:

 

THE FAMILY ROSE by Gloria Mount

Elizabeth is standing along side of what we are now calling, “The Family Rose”, at our home in California.

It was just a nice little red rose bush, to begin with and suddenly, it has taken on a life of its own.

It began with Liz’s wedding back in December 2004. The morning of her wedding, for various reasons, I was not able to attend her “original” ceremony. That morning, when I went to get the morning paper, I was heavy hearted.

Then I noticed this red rose, in full bloom….in the dead of winter, the only plant in the garden blooming. I was amazed, but knew the Lord was comforting me.

Come February 2005, the morning of my Mother-In-Law’s funeral….suddenly in our barren rose garden was this Red-Rose in full bloom!!! We cut it and took it with us to the services.

When Baby Luke was born, Oct. 2005 there was this Red-Rose!!

December 2005 when Christina was here for Christmas holidays, the day we took her to her Grandma’s grave site….here was this red-rose in full bloom!! We cut it and Chris put it on Grandma Mount’s lovely grave.

Now, May 2006, the morning of Liz’s Bday. I walked outside and saw 2 brilliant red buds….by the time we came back from her Bday breakfast…there was the Red Rose, in full bloom !!!!

Now, I’m wondering how Christina came to name her website….Cyerra Rose…I’m sure Chris wasn’t thinking of our roses here in Whittier….but “Some One” had guided her heart and mind.

As I’m writing this, the connection, now is amazing.

Cyerra Rose was always a beautiful name, but, now it all makes sense with our “Family Red Rose”.

God loves to delight us!!!!

If you’d like to stop by Gloria’s page and say HI and thank her for her story, it’s here: http://www.ryze.com/go/Italianmamma

In case you’d like to read about the other benefits, check out a post I wrote last month entitled “NATURES BENEFITS” at  http://tulipstalk.wordpress.com/2008/03/12/natures-benefits/

And if you like flower humor, here’s one for you:

What did the bee say to the flower?


“Hey bud, when do you open?

 

Time to get out the shovel … Happy Plant a Flower Day!

 

Heidi

Flower Study Unearths Buyers Generational Preferences


The Society of American Florists conducted research to find out what flowers “mean” to different generations. Here’s an excerpt of that study:

“SAF’s Generations of Flowers consumer research study, completed in January 2009, explores the motivations and barriers of how different age groups perceive, buy, and use flowers and floral outlets. Three generations of consumers were assessed through qualitative and quantitative measures: Generation Y (ages 18-30), Generation X (31-44), and Baby Boomers (45-60). The study methodology included:

Interviews with generational and gift giving research giants, Iconoculture and Roper
Two online focus groups of 57 individuals
Online survey of 1,557 flower consumers”

Key Inisghts Included Flowers and Gifting, Flower Purchase Behaviors and compared Boomers, Gen X’ers and Gen Y feelings toward flowers in general.

For instance when it comes to floral purchases

Gen Y is “most likely to purchase flowers in person and deliver flowers themselves. This echoes a “personalization” trend in gifting characteristic of this generation.”

And Gen Y is also “more likely to purchase flowers to impress guests in their home, significantly higher than other generations. This indicates an opportunity to reposition the value of flowers for the younger consumer.”

Compared to Gen X which “most likely purchases flowers as a traditional holiday/occasion gift for someone else, as a “just because” pick-me-up gift, and for home decoration.”

The Baby Boomer Generation “is significantly more likely than other generations to keep flowers in their consideration set when purchasing a gift, and to find flowers appropriate for a broad range of gifting situations.”

To read the rest of the study visit http://www.canadiangardencentre.ca/content/view/2017/38/

To order flowers visit: Eden Florist Today!

Today is Plant a Flower Day… In Honor of Earth Day


"Today is Earth Day and Plant a Flower Day"

“Flowers are good for the Earth AND for the Soul” Heidi Richards Mooney

Remember when you were a school girl (or boy as the case may be) and your teacher gave you a project of planting a seed in a paper cup? I do, I think the first time we did that was in 1st grade and the nuns (did I mention I’m a recovering Catholic? *SMILE) gave each student a paper cup, and some seeds which I don’t even recall what they were. We marched outside to the school yard, hoes in hand and began digging up the earth so we could put the dirt in our humble paper cups, add seeds, a little water and then wait.  We waited for what seemed like eternity (probably only a few days in adult time) as the paper cups sprouted little green leaves.  I remember how proud I was of that little plant… that I (and God) could actually create a living thing!  In fact, it is probably the only good memory I have of Catholic School.  This is, I am sure what started my love, awe and respect for flowers.

 

According to the National Gardening Association, gardening is one of the nation’s most popular pastimes. One in four Americans says that gardening is a real hobby or interest of theirs. About one in four spends four or more hours per week tending lawns, flowers, and vegetables.  It makes me wonder how it is around the world? In some parts the numbers are probably much higher!

 

It got me thinking about how flowers affect us in such profound ways. 

In Honor of Earth Day and Plant a Flower day….. Here’s a story Gloria Mount shared on the WIN network on RYZE Social network shared about how flowers have impacted her life:

 

THE FAMILY ROSE by Gloria Mount

Elizabeth is standing along side of what we are now calling, “The Family Rose”, at our home in California.

It was just a nice little red rose bush, to begin with and suddenly, it has taken on a life of its own.

It began with Liz’s wedding back in December 2004. The morning of her wedding, for various reasons, I was not able to attend her “original” ceremony. That morning, when I went to get the morning paper, I was heavy hearted.

Then I noticed this red rose, in full bloom….in the dead of winter, the only plant in the garden blooming. I was amazed, but knew the Lord was comforting me.

Come February 2005, the morning of my Mother-In-Law’s funeral….suddenly in our barren rose garden was this Red-Rose in full bloom!!! We cut it and took it with us to the services.

When Baby Luke was born, Oct. 2005 there was this Red-Rose!!

December 2005 when Christina was here for Christmas holidays, the day we took her to her Grandma’s grave site….here was this red-rose in full bloom!! We cut it and Chris put it on Grandma Mount’s lovely grave.

Now, May 2006, the morning of Liz’s Bday. I walked outside and saw 2 brilliant red buds….by the time we came back from her Bday breakfast…there was the Red Rose, in full bloom !!!!

Now, I’m wondering how Christina came to name her website….Cyerra Rose…I’m sure Chris wasn’t thinking of our roses here in Whittier….but “Some One” had guided her heart and mind.

As I’m writing this, the connection, now is amazing.

Cyerra Rose was always a beautiful name, but, now it all makes sense with our “Family Red Rose”.

God loves to delight us!!!!

If you’d like to stop by Gloria’s page and say HI and thank her for her story, it’s here: http://www.ryze.com/go/Italianmamma

In case you’d like to read about the other benefits, check out a post I wrote last month entitled “NATURES BENEFITS” at  http://tulipstalk.wordpress.com/2008/03/12/natures-benefits/

And if you like flower humor, here’s one for you:

What did the bee say to the flower?


“Hey bud, when do you open?

 

Time to get out the shovel … Happy Plant a Flower Day!

 

Heidi

Daffodils – The Principle of Becoming


There’s a new book in town and it is amazing! It is calledThe Garden of the Soul: lessons from four flowers that unearth the Self by my good friend Lynn Serafinn ~ Personal Transformation Coach

Here’s an excerpt from her book: Daffodils – The Principle of Becoming

We all associate springtime with new beginnings. After a long, barren winter of hiding under the earth, the flowers begin to emerge one at a time. Here in the UK, the first flower of spring is the daffodil. This week, I took two lovely long walks in different parts of town here in Bedford—one along the River Great Ouse, and the other through Bedford Park, a beautiful Victorian park that is much loved by us Bedfordians. Daffodils were bursting with bright yellow everywhere I walked, especially in one wooded section of the Park, which was actually the inspiration for the setting of one of the stories in my upcoming book, The Garden of the Soul: lessons from four flowers that unearth the Self. And when these brilliant flowers make an appearance, they really make an appearance. Never satisfied with being just a flower or two here and there, daffodils usually come in the hundreds when you find them. And what a glorious site they are. Their yellow colour and their unique shape makes you feel just as if the sun itself had decided to incarnate right there in the woods and burst into a thousand tiny suns. It is the true announcement that spring has come, and that new life is brewing all around us.

In my book, I use the daffodil as the symbol for “The Principle of Becoming”. “Becoming” means all that is continually evolving, growing and changing within us. Many of us fear change, but we all inwardly know that without change in our lives, we stagnate and die. Change is where innovation, imagination and creativity are born. It is the source of spontaneity, laughter and, ultimately, joy. “Becoming” therefore is the principle of regeneration and rebirth. No rebirth is able to take place without letting go of something else. In the case of the daffodils, they release themselves from the hidden safety of the earth, to take their chances in the open air of the late winter in the barren world above, before any of the other flowers dare attempt to poke their heads out. They do not wait to see if other flowers survive the ordeal first. They may look like light and cheerful flowers, and indeed they are; but in my view, they are also the most courageous.

We can learn from the daffodils by seeing that their glory lies in the fact that they took that bold chance, and are protected from harm, even when an unseasonable snowfall comes along. Like them, we can learn how to make courageous decisions in our lives by sensing when the time is right, and trusting the universe to carry us safely to our destination. It is when we procrastinate due to fear—of the unknown, of failure, of the judgement of others, or so many other things—that we often miss the opportunity the world is offering us. If the daffodil does not bloom in the spring, it has to wait until another year rolls around. Fear is inevitable in life. But fear itself is not our obstacle; it is merely an emotion. The real obstacle comes when we allow that fear to paralyse our own ability to grow. To master “The Principle of Becoming”, which is the lesson of the daffodil, we have to learn how to be comfortable with our own fears, and simply fall backwards into trust, for the greater purpose of feeling fully alive and bringing joy to the world.

This spring, when you see the daffodils, learn this vital lesson from them. Your glory in life begins the moment you hear the call of your own awakening and decide to take the chance to blossom, even in the face of your own fears. It is then when you too will take on the beauty of a thousand suns.

You can learn more about the lessons from the four flowers when you purchase my book The Garden of the Soul: lessons from four flowers that unearth the Self. It’s coming to Amazon on Tuesday 7 April 2009. AND if you join the “launch countdown”, you can find out how to receive 25 beautiful mind-body-spirit gifts donated by over 20 of my friends and colleagues, just for buying the book the day of the launch. Visit http://tinyurl.com/lynn-bonus for complete information. And be sure to keep an eye out for daffodils this week.

 

February’s flower is the Violet


Every flower has a history and symbolic meaning.  

 

Meaning: Modesty, faithfulness, virtue

February’s birth flower is the Violet.  It is also known as the African Violet. The flower is a five-petal velvety blossom that comes in shades of pinks, whites and purples. They are available as a houseplant or garden plant all year round.

Baron Walter Von Saint Paul Illaire is credited with discovering the violet plant in Tanzania in 1892.

Violet Facts, Trivia and Folklore:

 

The Greek word for violet is io. Io is a character in Greek mythology and the daughter of King Argos. Zeus loved her. However, Zeus was concerned that Hera (his wife) would discover their affair, so he turned Io into a heifer and then created the sweet-scented flowers that we now know as violets for her to graze upon.

 

 

Violets also have a unique method of reproduction, known as cleistogamy, which means to self-pollinate.    

 

During the Middle Ages, violets were a symbol for humility and modesty not only because of the blooming habits of the flower but also because of their association with the Virgin Mary. 
The god Hades fell in love with the maiden Persephone. One day while Persephone was walking through a field of violets, Hades carried her away to his land of death. The world mourned her death and became barren until Hades relented and agreed that Persephone could walk on the earth from spring through fall. Thus leading to violets symbolizing immortality, resurrection and spring. 

 

 

In Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Ophelia, upon learning of the death of her father, Polonius, speaks to the queen in the language of the flowers, quite common in the 16th century.  Her allusions are to the tragic event which has taken place and the emotions and attributes symbolized by certain flowers: rosemary for remembrance; pansies for love; fennel for flattery; columbine for ingratitude; rue for repentance; daisies for faithlessness; and violets for constancy or devotion.  In act IV, scene 5, she sings distraughtly while in the company of the queen, “

 

I would give some violets, but they withered all when my father died: they say he made a good end .”

The Greek dramatist, Aristophanes, referred to Athens in one of his plays as the violet-crowned city for King Ion (Ion means Violet).

 

When French composer Frederick Chopin died, one of his music students Jane Sterling bought all the violets she could find in the flower shops of Paris to cover his grave. So beloved is Chopin that, even today visitors daily place flowers (frequently violets) on this grave in Paris.

 

Josephine Bonaparte loved the scent of violets and thus they became her favorite perfume.  Before Napoleon was exiled in Elba, Josephine died and he picked a bouquet of violets for her grave. When Napoleon died, violets and a lock of Josephine’s hair were found in a locket that he wore.