Archives

February’s flower is the Violet


Every flower has a history and symbolic meaning.  

 

Meaning: Modesty, faithfulness, virtue

February’s birth flower is the Violet.  It is also known as the African Violet. The flower is a five-petal velvety blossom that comes in shades of pinks, whites and purples. They are available as a houseplant or garden plant all year round.

Baron Walter Von Saint Paul Illaire is credited with discovering the violet plant in Tanzania in 1892.

Violet Facts, Trivia and Folklore:

 

The Greek word for violet is io. Io is a character in Greek mythology and the daughter of King Argos. Zeus loved her. However, Zeus was concerned that Hera (his wife) would discover their affair, so he turned Io into a heifer and then created the sweet-scented flowers that we now know as violets for her to graze upon.

 

 

Violets also have a unique method of reproduction, known as cleistogamy, which means to self-pollinate.    

 

During the Middle Ages, violets were a symbol for humility and modesty not only because of the blooming habits of the flower but also because of their association with the Virgin Mary. 
The god Hades fell in love with the maiden Persephone. One day while Persephone was walking through a field of violets, Hades carried her away to his land of death. The world mourned her death and became barren until Hades relented and agreed that Persephone could walk on the earth from spring through fall. Thus leading to violets symbolizing immortality, resurrection and spring. 

 

 

In Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Ophelia, upon learning of the death of her father, Polonius, speaks to the queen in the language of the flowers, quite common in the 16th century.  Her allusions are to the tragic event which has taken place and the emotions and attributes symbolized by certain flowers: rosemary for remembrance; pansies for love; fennel for flattery; columbine for ingratitude; rue for repentance; daisies for faithlessness; and violets for constancy or devotion.  In act IV, scene 5, she sings distraughtly while in the company of the queen, “

 

I would give some violets, but they withered all when my father died: they say he made a good end .”

The Greek dramatist, Aristophanes, referred to Athens in one of his plays as the violet-crowned city for King Ion (Ion means Violet).

 

When French composer Frederick Chopin died, one of his music students Jane Sterling bought all the violets she could find in the flower shops of Paris to cover his grave. So beloved is Chopin that, even today visitors daily place flowers (frequently violets) on this grave in Paris.

 

Josephine Bonaparte loved the scent of violets and thus they became her favorite perfume.  Before Napoleon was exiled in Elba, Josephine died and he picked a bouquet of violets for her grave. When Napoleon died, violets and a lock of Josephine’s hair were found in a locket that he wore.

How To can Enjoy the Physical and Emotional Benefits of Flowers


red roseIncrease energy with red roses
Since red has the slowest vibratory rate and and longest wavelength, it stimulates adrenal glands, boosting energy.
blue purple irisBoost confidence with irises
The color indigo stimulates the brain’s pineal gland, which is the regulator of sleep patterns. Indigo also helps to free the mind of worries, fear and inhibition.
sunflowersEnhance alertness with sunflowers
Yellow lightwaves stimulate the brain, making you alert, clearheaded and decisive. And since we associate yellow with the sun’s rays and daylight, it’s said to help us feel more optimistic.
bluebellsGet a good night’s sleep with bluebells
Blue triggers the production of melotonin, a brain chemical that helps us relax and sleep soundly. Blue also stimulates the thyroid gland to release thyroxin, a hormone that regulates metabolic rate.
green zinniasRelax with green zinnias
Green affects the nervous system, making us breathe slowly and deeply, slowing the production of stress hormones and helping the heart relax.
orange gerbera daisyPrevent allergies with orange daisies
Orange strengthens the immune system and the lungs, which can ward off spring allergies. Orange also has a strong beneficial effect on the digestive system and can stimulate the sexual organs.
purple irisRelieve stress with lilacs
Violet cools us, alleviating “hot” conditions like heat rash and sunburn, and suppressing hunger and balancing metabolism. It also stimulates the pituitary gland, the part of the brain that releases tension-fighting beta-endorphins.
(source: ©Society of American Florists)

Language of Flowers Wordsearch Now LIVE!


red roseWe just created a Language of Flowers Wordsearch Puzzle at Eden Florist & Gift Baskets!

Check it out at http://www.edenflorist.com/flowerwordsearch.pdf.

If you’d like the answer key, leave a comment and I will send it to you!

NEED FLOWERS?  Be sure to visit Eden Florist online for our selection of everyday, birthday, anniversary, get well, new baby, business and just because flowers and gifts. Proudly serving South Florida for 27+ years!

Creating Moods through Flowers Video


Welcome to Flowers and Colors – The Secrets to Creating Moods through One of Natures Greatest Gifts – Flowers.  My name is Heidi Richards Mooney, Owner of Eden Florist and I am delighted to share a journey through floral history, myth and symbolism with you.

History of Saint Patty’s Day


Bells of Ireland

Bells of Ireland

Saint Patrick’s feast day, as a kind of national day, was already being celebrated by the Irish in Europe in the ninth and tenth centuries. In later times he become more and more widely known as the patron of Ireland.

Saint Patrick’s feast day was finally placed on the universal liturgical calendar in the Catholic Church due to the influence of Waterford-born Franciscan scholar Luke Wadding in the early 1600s. Saint Patrick’s Day thus became a holy day of obligation for Roman Catholics in Ireland.

In 1903, Saint Patrick’s Day became an official public holiday in Ireland. This was thanks to the Bank Holiday (Ireland) Act 1903, an act of the United Kingdom Parliament introduced by Irish MP James O’Mara. O’Mara later introduced the law that required that pubs and bars be closed on 17 March after drinking got out of hand, a provision that was repealed in the 1970s. The first Saint Patrick’s Day parade held in the Irish Free State was held in Dublin in 1931 and was reviewed by the then Minister of Defense Desmond Fitzgerald. Although secular celebrations now exist, the holiday remains a religious observance in Ireland, for both the Roman Catholic Church and the Church of Ireland.

In the mid-1990s the Irish government began a campaign to use Saint Patrick’s Day to showcase Ireland and its culture. The government set up a group called St. Patrick’s Festival, with the aim to:

— Offer a national festival that ranks amongst all of the greatest celebrations in the world and promote excitement throughout Ireland via innovation, creativity, grassroots involvement, and marketing activity.
— Provide the opportunity and motivation for people of Irish descent, (and those who sometimes wish they were Irish) to attend and join in the imaginative and expressive celebrations.
— Project, internationally, an accurate image of Ireland as a creative, professional and sophisticated country with wide appeal, as we approach the new millennium.[14]

The first Saint Patrick’s Festival was held on 17 March 1996. In 1997, it became a three-day event, and by 2000 it was a four-day event. By 2006, the festival was five days long; more than 675,000 people attended the 2009 parade. Overall 2009’s five day festival saw close to 1 million visitors, who took part in festivities that included concerts, outdoor theatre performances, and fireworks.

In every year since 1991, March has been proclaimed Irish-American Heritage Month by the US Congress or President due to the date of St. Patrick’s Day. Today, Saint Patrick’s Day is widely celebrated in America by Irish and non-Irish alike. It is one of the leading days for consumption of alcohol in the United States, and is typically one of the busiest days of the year for bars and restaurants. Many people, regardless of ethnic background, wear green clothing and items. Traditionally, those who are caught not wearing green are pinched affectionately.

Source: Wikipedia

Floral Personality Quizzes Abound Online


Today I was surfing the ‘net to find just the perfect floral quiz to share with readers of Tulips Talk. There were so many floral personality quizzes it amazed me. I had a difficult time narrowing them down. However, I did ~ here are what I consider the TOP SEVEN flower personality quizzes online (I did not include any that required a login or to subscribe first to see the results):

 

 

1. What’s your flower type at Quizilla http://www.quizilla.com/quizzes/9959891/whats-your-flower-type


2. Flowers that Match Your Personality Type
Quiz
http://www.streetdirectory.com/florist/singapore/flower_guide/quiz/flower_and_personality_type/

 

3. Which flower are you? How do your friends see you? http://www.youthink.com/quiz.cfm?action=go_detail&sub_action=take&obj_id=340

 

4. What is your flower personality (at SelectSmart.com) http://www.selectsmart.com/FREE/select.php?client=flowerprsnlty

 

5. Blogthings What Flower are you? Personality quiz http://www.blogthings.com/whatflowerareyouquiz/

 

6. Which Flower are You at AllTheTests.com for under 30ish  http://www.allthetests.com/quiz14/quizpu.php?testid=1118970425&katname=Plants-Personality-tests

 

7. And my favorite (it seems to be the most comprehensive) is the Society of American Florists Personality Quiz which I wrote about here: http://www.edenflorist.com/article_info.php?articles_id=34

To help you to find out the “floral personality” of your intended recipient here’s a direct link to the quiz: http://www.aboutflowers.com/quiz/quiz.html

Good luck with your quiz taking! Feel free to leave a comment below and let me know how accurate you think they were.