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SHIMMERY NEUTRALS & ORGANIC, NATURAL ELEMENTS TOP 2016 WEDDING TRENDS


Wedding Expert & Author Maggie Lord of Rustic Wedding Chic Weighs in on What to Expect for Next Year’s Nuptials

weddingflowers“Shimmery neutral colors and beautiful natural settings and design elements will be popping up for weddings in 2016,” says wedding expert and author Maggie Lord of Rustic Wedding Chic. Wedding attendees, engaged couples and planners can plan to see these trends emerge next year:

Metallic Color Themes

Expect plenty of shimmer and shine from weddings this year. Brides are finding new and exciting ways to incorporate metallic colors into their weddings, from beautiful bridesmaid dresses that sparkle to gorgeous centerpieces that complement the newly popular industrial wedding look.

Cream-Colored Bridesmaid Dresses

Rather than sticking with the classic white-wedding-gown/brightly-colored-bridesmaid-dress contrast, brides are finding that cream-colored bridesmaid dresses can add subtle beauty to the wedding party.

Flower Crowns

More brides are saying goodbye to the traditional veil and having fun with alternative headpieces. A big trend, especially among rustic and boho brides, is flower crowns. They are a great way to incorporate natural beauty into your wedding.

Monochromatic Color Theme

Weddings are going monochromatic in 2016! Brides are discovering less is more when it comes to their wedding color theme. All you need is one color – in a variety of shades – to create a beautiful wedding.

brideandgroomNational Park Weddings

Rustic brides are taking their love for the outdoors to a whole new level by having their weddings in a national park. They’re the perfect backdrop for picturesque wedding ceremonies and receptions.

Long-Sleeved Wedding Gowns

Popularized by celebrity Ashley Williams, the long-sleeved wedding gown is taking hold, with brides everywhere jumping on the craze. We expect this wedding gown inspiration to last well into 2016.

About Rustic Wedding Chic

Rustic Wedding Chic has become the wedding blog of choice for brides planning a rustic or country wedding. Launched in May of 2009 by Maggie Lord, Rustic Wedding Chic and The Rustic Wedding Guideinspire and guide couples with a daily muse of photography and information along with a curated directory of resources. With 11 million monthly pin views, Rustic Wedding Chic loves to showcase “real” weddings- filled with creative, dreamy and inspiring photos. Lord is the author of three books, Rustic Wedding Chic, Barn Weddings, and The Rustic Wedding Handbook. For more information, visit www.rusticweddingchic.com or follow RWC on Instagram @rusticweddingchic and on Pinterest.

Carrying over the Threshold and Other Wedding Traditions


! Tying Shoes to the Back of the Car ~ This custom dates back to the Egyptians (again!). They would often exchange or trade their sandals when the possession was passed on to another. Therefore, when the father “gave” his daughter to the groom, he would also give him his sandals. Later the Romans would shower the happy couple with shoes as they left the ceremony. Thank goodness for cars, because today the custom is tying shoes to the back of a car as a symbol of good luck.
! Carrying the Bride Over the Threshold ~ Romans believed that if a bride stumbled when she entered her new home, it would be a sign that bad luck and a doomed marriage were inevitable. Carrying the bride over the threshold would prevent this from happening.
! The Weather ~ Some say that when it rains on your wedding day it will bring unhappiness, bad luck and tears. Other beliefs are that rain brings good wishes and will wash away all the couple’s troubles and woes.
! Marry on Monday ~ Some couples even believe that certain days of the week bring more luck than others and they will even consult an astrologer for advice on the best day to marry. This custom dates back to ancient China.
! Proposals on February 29 (Leap Year) ~ This dates back hundreds of years to Medieval England. According to English law, February 29 was not recognized as a real day and therefore it was “leapt over” or ignored. Since it was not a real day, it was assumed that traditions had no real status. Therefore, women who worried about never marrying took advantage of this “loophole” and did the proposing.
“Yes, is only the Beginning.” If you are planning a wedding this is the perfect Wedding planner for you – and it’s FREE!  Just leave a comment below and WE will email you the link to grab it.

weddingpic! Tying Shoes to the Back of the Car ~ This custom dates back to the Egyptians (again!). They would often exchange or trade their sandals when the possession was passed on to another. Therefore, when the father “gave” his daughter to the groom, he would also give him his sandals. Later the Romans would shower the happy couple with shoes as they left the ceremony. Thank goodness for cars, because today the custom is tying shoes to the back of a car as a symbol of good luck.

! Carrying the Bride Over the Threshold ~ Romans believed that if a bride stumbled when she entered her new home, it would be a sign that bad luck and a doomed marriage were inevitable. Carrying the bride over the threshold would prevent this from happening.

! The Weather ~ Some say that when it rains on your wedding day it will bring unhappiness, bad luck and tears. Other beliefs are that rain brings good wishes and will wash away all the couple’s troubles and woes.

! Marry on Monday ~ Some couples even believe that certain days of the week bring more luck than others and they will even consult an astrologer for advice on the best day to marry. This custom dates back to ancient China.

! Proposals on February 29 (Leap Year) ~ This dates back hundreds of years to Medieval England. According to English law, February 29 was not recognized as a real day and therefore it was “leapt over” or ignored. Since it was not a real day, it was assumed that traditions had no real status. Therefore, women who worried about never marrying took advantage of this “loophole” and did the proposing.

Excerpt from: “Yes, is only the Beginning.” If you are planning a wedding this is the perfect Wedding planner for you – and it’s FREE!  Just leave a comment below and WE will email you the link to grab it.

When choosing flowers for you wedding in South Florida be sure to give Eden Florist a call at 954-981-5515 or 800-966-3336, the shop voted BEST Florist in Broward County by the Herald 5 years in a row.  And Top Three florist in South Florida by WSVN Channel 7!

Even MORE Wedding Customs and Traditions


! Breaking Glass ~ Breaking the wineglass by stomping on it is a tradition, which reminds the Jews of the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem among other meanings. Other beliefs include that the marriage will last until the glass is put together again, or last forever, or that the number of pieces it breaks into is a sign of haw many years the two will live together, or how many children they will have.
! Throwing the Garter ~ This practice began in France when the Bridal attire was considered lucky. Therefore, anyone who caught a piece of the Bride’s clothing could expect good fortune. In the USA, the groom removes the bride’s garter and throws it to unmarried men. The one who catches it is then thought to be the next to get married. This garter is placed on the bride’s right leg, just above the knee. Many brides will wear two garters, one to throw and one to keep.
! Tossing the Bouquet ~ This is a “spin-off” of throwing the garter that is practiced today. The single woman who catches the bouquet is thought to be the next to get married.
! Throwing Rice or Confetti ~ This practice began with the Pagans many centuries ago. It was believed that the throwing of rice or confetti on the Bride and Groom encouraged fertility and easier childbirth for the bride.
! The Wedding Cake ~ The wedding cake was originally a cake of wheat or barley, a custom that started with the Egyptians, who broke the cake over the bride’s head to invoke fertility.
! To the Left of the Groom ~ The bride standing to the left of the groom dates back to the days when the groom would capture his bride by “kidnapping” her. Should a battle with other men ensue, the groom would hold his soon-to-be wife with his left hand so his right hand would be free to use his sword, in order to defend himself and his bride.

tossthebouquetTossing the Bouquet ~ This is a “spin-off” of throwing the garter that is practiced today. The single woman who catches the bouquet is thought to be the next to get married.

! Breaking Glass ~ Breaking the wineglass by stomping on it is a tradition, which reminds the Jews of the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem among other meanings. Other beliefs include that the marriage will last until the glass is put together again, or last forever, or that the number of pieces it breaks into is a sign of haw many years the two will live together, or how many children they will have.

! Throwing the Garter ~ This practice began in France when the Bridal attire was considered lucky. Therefore, anyone who caught a piece of the Bride’s clothing could expect good fortune. In the USA, the groom removes the bride’s garter and throws it to unmarried men. The one who catches it is then thought to be the next to get married. This garter is placed on the bride’s right leg, just above the knee. Many brides will wear two garters, one to throw and one to keep.

! Throwing Rice or Confetti ~ This practice began with the Pagans many centuries ago. It was believed that the throwing of rice or confetti on the Bride and Groom encouraged fertility and easier childbirth for the bride.

! The Wedding Cake ~ The wedding cake was originally a cake of wheat or barley, a custom that started with the Egyptians, who broke the cake over the bride’s head to invoke fertility.

! To the Left of the Groom ~ The bride standing to the left of the groom dates back to the days when the groom would capture his bride by “kidnapping” her. Should a battle with other men ensue, the groom would hold his soon-to-be wife with his left hand so his right hand would be free to use his sword, in order to defend himself and his bride.

“Yes, is only the Beginning.” If you are planning a wedding this is the perfect Wedding planner for you – and it’s FREE!  Just leave a comment below and WE will email you the link to grab it.

When choosing flowers for you wedding in South Florida be sure to give Eden Florist a call at 954-981-5515 or 800-966-3336, the shop voted BEST Florist in Broward County by the Herald 5 years in a row.  And Top Three florist in South Florida by WSVN Channel 7!

Preserving Your Flowers


Since June is Wedding Month I thought I’d start writing about Weddings beginning with how to Preserve Your Wedding Flowers:

10 Simple Steps To Make Your Bouquets Last

preservingflowers

Step 1:

Let the fresh bouquet air dry for four to five weeks. Leave it uncovered and assembled, only removing any ribbons, tulling and pearls that may be included in the design. A shelf in a dry place left undisturbed would be ideal.

Step 2:

When your bouquet has dried sufficiently, you will need to have the following materials in order to create your lasting memory and work of art: a 12″ x 8″ glass dome and a wooden base with a 9″ diameter, 1 block of floral foam used for silk and dried floral arrangements, and a hot melt glue gun or a small strip of stickum or cling (about 6″ length), and some sort of sealer spray or varnish, and a couple of moth balls.

Step 3:

Cut floral foam to 3x3x3″ in size and fasten onto the center of wooden base using the hot glue or stickum.

Step 4:

Disassemble the bouquet, leaving the stems the length they were in the original bouquet. Throw away any bruised or unattractive looking flowers. Separate flowers into “like” categories, such as roses, carnations, lilies, etc. You may wish to spray the foliage with a gold spray paint, which will improve their appearance. You may also wish to “touch up” some of the remaining flowers with a floral or other spray paint.

Step 5:

If your bouquet has a ribbon, bow, or tulling, attach it to the top of the foam using a little hot glue to secure it in place.

Step 6:

Insert first flower in center of foam using the longest stem and trimming it to about 9 or 10″ in length. This will be your guide for inserting the rest of the flowers. Design them in a pyramid or oval shape downward, making sure they do not exceed the length of the first flower.

Step 7:

Distribute flowers and other materials equally on every side. Check the width of the floral arrangement periodically to make sure it does not exceed the width of the dome.

Step 8:

Weave any extra tulling, ribbons, and pearls into the arrangement so that it is appealing to the eye. You may wish to purchase extra filler flowers, such as babies breath or statice to add to the design.

Step 9:

Place moth balls under the arrangement, tucked into the base of the design so that it is hidden from view. Replace mothballs at least every 2 years. The mothballs will repel weevils.

Step 10:

Do not seal the dome. This will make it easier to clean. If you seal it, it may become cloudy. Enjoy your beautiful bouquet!

10 Simple Steps To Make Your Bouquets Last
Step 1:
Let the fresh bouquet air dry for four to five weeks. Leave it uncovered and assembled, only removing any ribbons, tulling and pearls that may be included in the design. A shelf in a dry place left undisturbed would be ideal.
Step 2:
When your bouquet has dried sufficiently, you will need to have the following materials in order to create your lasting memory and work of art: a 12″ x 8″ glass dome and a wooden base with a 9″ diameter, 1 block of floral foam used for silk and dried floral arrangements, and a hot melt glue gun or a small strip of stickum or cling (about 6″ length), and some sort of sealer spray or varnish, and a couple of moth balls.
Step 3:
Cut floral foam to 3x3x3″ in size and fasten onto the center of wooden base using the hot glue or stickum.
Step 4:
Disassemble the bouquet, leaving the stems the length they were in the original bouquet. Throw away any bruised or unattractive looking flowers. Separate flowers into “like” categories, such as roses, carnations, lilies, etc. You may wish to spray the foliage with a gold spray paint, which will improve their appearance. You may also wish to “touch up” some of the remaining flowers with a floral or other spray paint.
Step 5:
If your bouquet has a ribbon, bow, or tulling, attach it to the top of the foam using a little hot glue to secure it in place.
Step 6:
Insert first flower in center of foam using the longest stem and trimming it to about 9 or 10″ in length. This will be your guide for inserting the rest of the flowers. Design them in a pyramid or oval shape downward, making sure they do not exceed the length of the first flower.
Step 7:
Distribute flowers and other materials equally on every side. Check the width of the floral arrangement periodically to make sure it does not exceed the width of the dome.
Step 8:
Weave any extra tulling, ribbons, and pearls into the arrangement so that it is appealing to the eye. You may wish to purchase extra filler flowers, such as babies breath or statice to add to the design.
Step 9:
Place moth balls under the arrangement, tucked into the base of the design so that it is hidden from view. Replace mothballs at least every 2 years. The mothballs will repel weevils.
Step 10:
Do not seal the dome. This will make it easier to clean. If you seal it, it may become cloudy. Enjoy your beautiful bouquet!

Before You Plan Your Wedding, Read This


…Book by my good friend Pam Archer.

It’s called 99 Things You Wish You Knew Before You Planned Your Wedding. And it’s the best! It is small, simple to read and filled with bite-sized tips to help you including Doing Your Homework, Budgetting, Who to Invite, Using a Wedding Planner, Using Professionals (instead of your friends and relatives – unless of course they take pictures, do video, do flowers, etc. for a living), Personalizing your wedding, Your Husband, and even some tips for “The Morning After” when you are actually married!

I may be a little partial to the book, because I contributed a small essay to one of the chapters about the question most often asked of a florist “will my bouquet be beautiful?”  My flip answer was “we charge extra for beautiful.” But seriously the real answer is when it truly reflects the brides taste and choice and is done to her specifications then of course it will be beautiful.  Even though beauty is in the eyes of the beholder, our ultimate goal with any wedding or event is to be a small part of making it the most beautiful day of a bride and groom’s life and that means, yes it will be beautiful!

Let’s face it, when you hire professionals to create the perfect wedding including your florist, then it is our job to do our job.  Create beautiful, professionally designed floral pieces that add to the overall event.  Of course, budgetting and seasonality are certainly things to consider when planning your floral decor.  We may not be able to make a $1,000 budget look like $10,000 but we can certainly help any bride get the most for their investment.

99 Things You Wish You Knew Before You Planned Your Wedding also includes A Budget Guide, A Flower Checklist and a Resource Section to help any budget concious, creative bride plan the perfect wedding!

Go here to order: http://www.99-series.com/wedding.html.

And if you are planning a wedding in South Florida Give Eden Florist a Call at 800-966-3336 or 954-981-5515. We will be happy to work with you!

Eden Florist Provides Flowers for Preview of THE PROPOSAL


A week ago Ellen Burton, Publisher of Duo Magazine (and a dear friend of mine) called and asked if I wanted to participate in the media event for the new movie, THE PROPOSAL. I said, “Absolutely!” The event took place last evening at Muvico in Pembroke Pines. It included a Fashion Show, an after party and a pre-screening of the movie. Several hundred people arrived for the event, including women in wedding gowns, men in tuxedos (the fashionistas), the media (Deco Drive was on the scene) and the event planners from Disney.  I was so excited and honored to be a play a very small part in making it happen. Here are some pictures of the event complete with quickly assembled hand-held wedding bouquets. We put together very light, summer flowers that would not require the bride to worry about the bouquet as she greets her guests and admirers.

According to a review by the Sun-Sentinel “The Proposal won’t catch any bouquets for originality, but in terms of a bended-knee pitch for the affections of women — including Ryan Reynolds’ boyish charms, a hip granny and even a beyond-adorable puppy — this romantic comedy pretty much pulls out all the stops.” You can read about it and see a trailer of the movie here: http://www.sun-sentinel.com/features/lifestyle/sfl-the-proposal-review-g061909pbjun19,0,630213.story.

Check out Duo Magazine at: http://www.myspace.com/duomagazine

Bride is carying a hand-tied bouquet of yellow roses

Bride is carrying a hand-tied bouquet of red gerbera daisies

Bride is carrying a bouquet of white alstromeria

Bride is carrying a hand-tied bouquet of peach stock

Bride is carrying a hand-tied bouquet of pink snapdragons and larkspur

Cake was provided by HeavenLeeCakes.com, Limo was supplied by Larry’s Private Car and Limo ServiceDJ was Egon Flux  and of course, the flowers were created and designed by Eden Florist ~  www.EdenFlorist.com.

Ps. if you are getting married in South Florida be sure to give Eden Florist a call at 954-981-5515. We do events of any size and WE come to you!  We will meet you at the venue and go over all your wedding needs.  Did you know that when you book a wedding that is happening in the summer months of June – August 2009, you will receive 10% off your entire floral order.