Tag Archive | cooking with flowers

Worth Reading – Cooking with Flowers: Sweet and Savory Recipes


"Cooking with Flowers: Sweet and Savory Recipes with Rose Petals, Lilacs, Lavender, and Other Edible Flowers"When I was reading BIG CHEF Online, one of my favorite blogs for Party Planning and Cooking, I stumbled across this great book Cooking with Flowers: Sweet and Savory Recipes with Rose Petals, Lilacs, Lavender, and Other Edible Flowers by Miche Bacher and thought it would be the perfect book to recommend to our blog readers for the end of 2013.

In it you will find more than 100 recipes that will bring beautiful flower-filled dishes to your kitchen table! This easy-to-use cookbook is brimming with scrumptious botanical treats, from sweet violet cupcakes, pansy petal pancakes, daylily cheesecake, and rosemary flower margaritas to savory sunflower chickpea salad, chive blossom vinaigrette, herb flower pesto, and mango orchid sticky rice.

Alongside every recipe are tips and tricks for finding, cleaning, and preparing edible blossoms. You’ll also learn how to infuse vinegars, vodkas, sugars, frostings, jellies and jams, ice creams, and more with the color and flavor of your favorite flowers. Fresh from the farmers’ market or plucked from your very own garden, a world of delectable flowers awaits!

You can get a copy on Amazon for only $17.32. Cooking with Flowers: Sweet and Savory Recipes with Rose Petals, Lilacs, Lavender, and Other Edible Flowers is sure to be one of my new favorite cookbooks and maybe it will also be yours!

Lavender Beef with Peppercorns


It’s amazing all the herbs and flowers you can cook with.  Here ia a recipe I found for beef tenderloin with lavender and peppercorns. Try it. It is really good.

1 (3- to 4-pound) beef tenderloin roast
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoons whole black peppercorns
1 tablespoons whole white peppercorns
2 tablespoons fennel seeds
1 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
2 tablespoons dried culinary lavender flowers

Bring roast to room temperature before cooking. Trim the tenderloin of fat and silverskin.  Note: Silverskin is the silvery-white connective tissue. It doesn’t dissolve when the tenderloin is cooked, so it needs to be trimmed away.

Pat the beef dry with paper towels. Lightly oil outside of roast.

In a small spice or coffee grinder, coarsely grind the black peppercorns, white peppercorns, fennel seeds, thyme, and lavender flowers; rub mixture all over the meat. Wrap tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 2 hours or overnight (preferably).

Preheat oven to 425°F. Unwrap roast and place onto a rack in a shallow baking pan, tucking the thin end under to make it as thick as the rest of the roast. Place roast onto a rack in a shallow baking pan, tucking the thin end under to make it as thick as the rest of the roast. Roast for 15 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 325°F and continue to roast until the internal temperature reaches desired temperature on a meat thermometer (see below).
Rare – 120°F
Medium Rare – 125°F
Medium – 130°F

Remove from oven and transfer onto a cutting board; let stand 15 minutes before carving (meat temperature will rise 5 to 10 degrees after it is removed from the oven).

Transfer onto a serving platter and serve immediately with any accumulated juices.

Makes 6 to 8 servings.

Source: http://whatscookingamerica.net/Beef/lavenderbeef.htm

For a complete list of edible flowers, Check out the Edible Flower Chart at Eden Florist.

Cooking With Flowers


More on Edible Flowers

Nasturtium ~ This flower has a pepper scent and its colorful yellow, orange and red petals can be tossed in a salad. The whole blossoms can be stuffed with savory mousse; the petals can be shredded and added to risotto or mixed with olive oil and combined with cooked pasta; the leaves taste similar to watercress. 

For more ideas on cooking with flowers, check out the following books, Flower Cookery – The Art of Cooking with Flowersby Mary MacNichol or “Edible Flowers from Garden to Palate” by Cathy Wilkinson

When you have time, read this great post at About.com – Edible Flowers History

In celebration of Rose Month, why not try the Rose-Glazed Brie Recipe?