Tag Archive | History of Flowers

Meet the Desert Rose


"Meet the Desert Rose"Name: Desert Rose Cactus

Family: Crassulaceae (Echeveria)

Meaning: Endurance, fortitude

Common Names: Pinwheel Desert Rose, Irish Rose

History:

The word cactus is derived from the Greek word “Kaktos” and refers to a plant with spiny thistles on it. It has also been referred to as the “Mother-in-law’s Cushion”. The Desert Rose is a water-storing, evergreen perennial with tight rosettes that come in a variety of colors and are predominantly available in the winter and spring. The spoon-shaped leaves look like flower petals, which resemble a rose are native to semi-desert areas of Central America, from Mexico to north-western South America.

Because of its nature to withstand the test of time, the cactus symbolizes endurance and longevity.

The Desert Rose makes a perfect desktop gift for an office.

Flowers and Their Meaning: The Poppy


"Meaning and History of the Poppy"

Poppy – Meaning: “Wealth and Success”

Botanical Name: Bocconia    Family: Papaveraceae

We are slumberous Poppies,
Lords of Lethe downs,
Some awake and some asleep,
Sleeping in our crowns.
What perchance our dreams may know,
Let our serious beauty show.

There are many kinds of poppy, including California poppies, Iceland poppies, and perennial poppies. Red poppies symbolize fantastic extravagance. On the other hand, yellow poppies stand for wealth and success. White ones can convey forgetfulness and sleep.  Poppy is among the most loved flowers. These plants generally bloom during the spring and early summer.

The field poppy was grown by the ancient Egyptians.

The poppy plant was sacred to Ceres, the Roman goddess of grain. She was often depicted wearing wearing a wreath made of the blooms and carrying corn, which she would offer as a sacrifice to the Gods.  The poppy has been called many names such as Thunder flower. The myth is that when children would pick the flower, the petals would fall and they would then be struck by Thunder.  One of the old country names was Cheesebowl because there is a little round bowl in the bottom of the flower’s head, filled with seeds set in something that resembles cheese. The poppy has also been associated with fertility, and represented the blood of dead warriors. Because of the its strong smell, it has even been called the headache flower.

When you need flowers, remember Eden Florist & Gift Baskets
Note: the header image for this blog is a field of poppies

February’s flower is the Violet


Every flower has a history and symbolic meaning.  

 

Meaning: Modesty, faithfulness, virtue

February’s birth flower is the Violet.  It is also known as the African Violet. The flower is a five-petal velvety blossom that comes in shades of pinks, whites and purples. They are available as a houseplant or garden plant all year round.

Baron Walter Von Saint Paul Illaire is credited with discovering the violet plant in Tanzania in 1892.

Violet Facts, Trivia and Folklore:

 

The Greek word for violet is io. Io is a character in Greek mythology and the daughter of King Argos. Zeus loved her. However, Zeus was concerned that Hera (his wife) would discover their affair, so he turned Io into a heifer and then created the sweet-scented flowers that we now know as violets for her to graze upon.

 

 

Violets also have a unique method of reproduction, known as cleistogamy, which means to self-pollinate.    

 

During the Middle Ages, violets were a symbol for humility and modesty not only because of the blooming habits of the flower but also because of their association with the Virgin Mary. 
The god Hades fell in love with the maiden Persephone. One day while Persephone was walking through a field of violets, Hades carried her away to his land of death. The world mourned her death and became barren until Hades relented and agreed that Persephone could walk on the earth from spring through fall. Thus leading to violets symbolizing immortality, resurrection and spring. 

 

 

In Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Ophelia, upon learning of the death of her father, Polonius, speaks to the queen in the language of the flowers, quite common in the 16th century.  Her allusions are to the tragic event which has taken place and the emotions and attributes symbolized by certain flowers: rosemary for remembrance; pansies for love; fennel for flattery; columbine for ingratitude; rue for repentance; daisies for faithlessness; and violets for constancy or devotion.  In act IV, scene 5, she sings distraughtly while in the company of the queen, “

 

I would give some violets, but they withered all when my father died: they say he made a good end .”

The Greek dramatist, Aristophanes, referred to Athens in one of his plays as the violet-crowned city for King Ion (Ion means Violet).

 

When French composer Frederick Chopin died, one of his music students Jane Sterling bought all the violets she could find in the flower shops of Paris to cover his grave. So beloved is Chopin that, even today visitors daily place flowers (frequently violets) on this grave in Paris.

 

Josephine Bonaparte loved the scent of violets and thus they became her favorite perfume.  Before Napoleon was exiled in Elba, Josephine died and he picked a bouquet of violets for her grave. When Napoleon died, violets and a lock of Josephine’s hair were found in a locket that he wore.

Flower Trivia – the answer


On Tuesday, I asked: What is the famous aria that Don Jose sings to Carmen in the second act of George Bizet’s “Carmen?” What happened in the first act that set up the scene?

 

Answer: The aria is “La Fleur que tu m’avais jetee’ (the flower that you threw at me). Don Jose tells Carmen that the only thing that kept him alive in prison was the cassia flower she had thrown at his feet when he was arrested for fighting with his co-worker.

If you one of the first three to post a comment, you will receive a beatiful book of Friendship Quotes in the mail in the next few days.

Creating Moods through Flowers Video


Welcome to Flowers and Colors – The Secrets to Creating Moods through One of Natures Greatest Gifts – Flowers.  My name is Heidi Richards Mooney, Owner of Eden Florist and I am delighted to share a journey through floral history, myth and symbolism with you.

How Did The Passion Flower Get Its Name?


Passion Flower ~ Belief

passion flower

She heard no sound before her gate,
Though very quiet was her bower.
All was as her hand had left it late:
The needle slept on the broidered vine,
Where the hammer & spikes of the passion-flower
Her fashioning did wait.”
Helen Gray Cone

In the 16th Century Christian Missionaries in South America named the flower (Passiflora spp) because they saw it as being a symbol of the death of Jesus Christ. It was the first flower they saw on their journey and they saw it as a good sign.

They thought that the five sepals and the five petals of the passion flower represented the ten disciples without Judas Iscariot and Peter.

They also thought that the double row of filaments (corona) on the passion flower represented the crown of thorns that Jesus was made to wear. It also resembled a halo.

The vine tendrils represented the whips that were used to scourge Jesus.

As a naturally grown medicinal herb, the passion flower is used as a sedative in nervous disorders (including gastrointestinal complaints of nervous origin), difficulties in sleeping, and anxiety or restlessness. Passion Flower reduces spasms and depresses the central nervous system. (Note: consult a health care professional before using passion flower as a medicinal supplement or herb).

The plant is indigenous to an area from the southeast U.S. to Argentina and Brazil.