Tag Archive | today is

March 27 is Cherry Blossom Day


Today is Cherry Blossom Day ~ On March 27, 1912, 1st Lady Taft and Viscountess Chinda, wife of the Japanese ambassador planted a cherry tree on the bank of the Tidal Basin. This started a hundred plus year tradition in Washington D.C. known as the Cherry Blossom Festival. Over the next 7 years more than 3,000 trees were planted which had been grafted from trees on the bank of the Arakawa River in Adachi Ward (Tokyo). Cherry Treas are one of the most prominent symbols of the U.S. capital today. In fact, visitors from around the globe travel to Washington, D.C. every spring to see the Cherry trees in bloom
 
Cherry blossoms can be used in teas such as Sachura Tea (made by pouring hot water over a salted cherry blossom, or in teabags containing dried flowers), deserts such as Sachura Mochi (filled with anko, or sweetened red bean paste) and as flavorings for other foods.

Cherry blossoms are a popular adornment for floral decor and used by florists everywhere.

Today is Cherry Blossom Day


Today is Cherry Blossom Day ~ On March 27, 1912, 1st Lady Taft and Viscountess Chinda, wife of the Japanese ambassador planted a cherry tree on the bank of the Tidal Basin. This started a hundred plus year tradition in Washington D.C. known as the Cherry Blossom Festival. Over the next 7 years more than 3,000 trees were planted which had been grafted from trees on the bank of the Arakawa River in Adachi Ward (Tokyo). Cherry Treas are one of the most prominent symbols of the U.S. capital today. In fact, visitors from around the globe travel to Washington, D.C. every spring to see the Cherry trees in bloom

 
Cherry blossoms can be used in teas such as Sachura Tea (made by pouring hot water over a salted cherry blossom, or in teabags containing dried flowers), deserts such as Sachura Mochi (filled with anko, or sweetened red bean paste) and as flavorings for other foods.

Cherry blossoms are a popular adornment for floral decor and used by florists everywhere.

Today is Saint David’s Day


"Happy Saint David's Day"
Saint David was recognized as a Catholic saint in 1120 as the patron saint of Wales. After the Protestant Reformation, Saint David’s birthday, today, March 1, became a national festival. It is celebrated by schools and cultural societies throughout Wales. One of the customs during Saint David’s Day is to wear a leek or a daffodil (two of their national emblems).

Today is National Disc Jockey Day


January 2oth had been designated as National Disc Jockey Day.

So my staff and I created a Tropical Disc Jockey Bouquet.

Here it is:

 

Each “record” in the arrangement is imprinted with “National Disc Jockey Day ~ January 20, 2009”

If you’d like to order this bouquet, call us at 954-981-5515 or 800-966-3336 today!

Today is…


Mustard Seed Day!

The kingdom of heaven is like to a grain of mustard seed, which a man took, and sowed in his field: Which indeed is the least of all seeds: but when it is grown, it is the greatest among herbs, and becometh a tree, so that the birds of the air come and lodge in the branches thereof.
Matthew 13:31-32

About This Date

Mustard is a popular seasoning in kitchens around the world. But, what about those cute, little white mustard seeds? Grown in Europe and in the north part of the U.S., they have been used for lots of other interesting reasons.

Ground into a powder and dried, they were an old remedy for colds and rheumatism.

As a fertilizer, they will give your daffodils stronger color.

You can even put dried mustard in your shoes to prevent cold feet!

(Source: Celebrate the Date)

Is today a special day in your life of the life of someone you know? Honor her or him with flowers from Eden Florist in South Florida. We deliver to Miramar, Pembroke Pines, Hollywood, Hallandale, West Park, Weston, Cooper City, Davie, and Greater Fort Lauderdale (and most of Miami). 

Today is Limerick Day!


Today is Limerick Day!

In case you didn’t already know it, a limerick is a five-line poem with a strict form, originally popularized in English by Edward Lear. Limericks are frequently witty or humorous, and sometimes obscene with humorous intent.

Hitory of Limericks:
Variants of the form of poetry referred to as Limerick poems can be traced back to the fourteenth century English history. Limericks were used in Nursery Rhymes and other poems for children. But as limericks were short, relatively easy to compose and bawdy or sexual in nature they were often repeated by beggars or the working classes in the British pubs and taverns of the fifteenth, sixteenth and seventh centuries. The poets who created these limericks were therefore often drunkards! Limericks were also referred to as dirty.

The word derives from the Irish town of Limerick. Apparently a pub song or tavern chorus based on the refrain “Will you come up to Limerick?” where, of course, such bawdy songs or ‘Limericks’ were sung.

In honor of Limerick Day (and being of Irish decent) … here’s a little ditty I wrote:

There once was a girl named Rosie
She really liked all kinds of posies
She could sit for hours
Just picking flowers
And walk in the beds on her tip tosies.

Have a happy Limerick Day… And if you are so inclined, send flowers and a limerick to your favorite lad or lass.  Just call Eden Florist at 800-966-3336 or 954-981-5515 or visit us online at www.EdenFlorist.com.

Warmest regards,

Heidi