Flowers – How Colors Make a Difference


"Flowers - How Colors Make a Difference"
Flowers – How Colors Make a Difference

Human beings first used natural colors centuries ago. During those times synthetic colors were not available. Flowers were the main source of color. This article does not intend to go into how the colors were extracted and so on, but how colors of flowers can make our life a better living experience. Let us examine.

Look at flowers. You will find a range of colors -from purest white to black. Some flowers are single colored while many have colors so beautifully mixed that no painter can do something similar. The first observation we can make is – all colors look good on flowers. We may hate a color, for example you may dislike yellow. But if you pick up a yellow colored flower, you may not dislike it. Why? Because the color merges so well with the structure and texture of the flower that it does not remain separate but merges totally in the flower. I hope I am making myself clear. What I mean to say that even if you hold a yellow colored flower, you will not be noticing only the color, but the touch, the shape, the fragrance and the symmetry of the flower. Color has merged itself with other qualities to create something beautiful. Is this making sense?

Flowers are like friends; they bring color to your world.” — Unknown

I have been talking about the colors. But I could have been as well talking about any other quality of the flower. My contention is simple. If a quality does not overpower other qualities but merges with them the result can be great. We as human beings can do the same – as the members of a family, a team or a part of business group or as citizens of our nation. Instead of overpowering others with our qualities, if we try to merge and create a whole, the outcome will always be much better. The focus is to dissolve one’s individual ego and work together in tandem.

Lucky in Love – The 21 World Wedding Traditions To Bring You Good Fortune


"Lucky in Love – The 21 World Wedding Traditions To Bring You Good Fortune"
Lucky in Love – The 21 World Wedding Traditions To Bring You Good Fortune

New Research from 888Poker finds some of the wedding rituals you might not know, from animal gifts to stealing shoes – and finds nearly half of survey respondents wore a lucky charm to their wedding.

Everyone loves a wedding. Spirits are high, drinks are flowing, the best man is shaving the groom, the mother-in-law is throwing ducks at the bride…

Weddings are different for every culture around the world. And now a new infographic lets you see a collection of the most interesting and most colourful – though it’s up to you whether you want to include them in your own special day.

A Different Type of Wedding Bell

Some of the rituals might be more familiar – like throwing the bouquet or breaking a glass – but others won’t be. While nearly 75% of unmarried couples wouldn’t get married without the (Western) traditional collection of things old, new, borrowed, and blue, would they be willing to borrow an old tradition like:

  • Running away? – in Venezuela, it’s good luck for the newly-married couple to attempt to escape undetected during the reception.
  • Baumstamm Sägen? – in Germany, the couple work together with a two-handed saw to cut a log, representing the first obstacle the couple must jointly overcome.
  • Joota Chupai? – in India, when the groom enters the temple, he has to take off his shoes. The eldest unmarried girls from the bride’s family then steal them, and there ensues a friendly struggle between the families over them. Usually it ends in the shoes being ransomed back to the poor groom.
  • Bell breaking? – in Guatemala, the groom’s mother breaks a specially-made ceramic bell  filled with grains, as a symbol of prosperity. Not to be confused with Irish bells, where you’re only meant to ring it!
  • Wedding ducks? – a Korean tradition in which caved wooden ducks or geese are thrown to the bride by her mother-in-law. Mandarin ducks mate for life, representing the marriage, and whether the bride catches it or not supposedly affects the gender of her first child.

The piece is accompanied by a survey of respondent’s own beliefs on weddings – which found results like:

  • Over 70% of men believe it’s bad luck to see their bride in her wedding dress before the big day.
  • 10% of those who cohabit would stray from tradition and have the bride make a speech on the day as well as the groom, best man, and bride’s father.
  • Over 25% believe in some form of lucky wedding ritual.
  • Nearly 12% of women say that they would be prepared to propose to their (hopefully) future husbands, breaking with the one-sided tradition.

Whether you’re looking for a bit of extra luck at your wedding, or have some unusual traditions of your own, have a look at some of the other rituals and traditions from around the world in the infographic here.

Flower Trivia – Answer to Yesterday’s Question


Double Phalaenopsis Orchid

The Orchid

Confucius acknowledged orchids saying, “the association with a superior person is like entering a hall of orchids”. In 1595 a Chinese flower-arranging book “A Treatise of Vase Flowers” by Chang Ch’ien -te said orchids were in the top ranking of desirability.

The orchid is also the World’s Most Diverse Plant Family

 
There are between 30,000 and 40,000 species of Orchids making them the  world’s most diverse plant family. Almost every month new species are found and documented and very often they are found to be a completely new genus.  (source: Bella Online)
 
And the world’s most Popular Orchid is the Phalaenopsis. In fact, more phalaeonopsis orchids are grown and sold than any other type in the world. They come in a wide variety of colors from whites to vivid purples and blooms can last up to four months.
You can learn more about orchids at Orchids Usa 
You can order Orchid plants and flowers at Eden Florist

A Simple Story of Sunflowers


Read this wonderful story of Sunflowers….

In Dreams, Love and Sunflowers
by Julie Jordan Scott 

My six-year-old daughter Emma is the personification of passion in a compact, package. She and I planted a “Sunflower Farm” two years ago in our front and back yard. Sixteen seeds, sixteen incredible flowers became alive in our yard.

 We became fascinated in the study of these plants themselves. Sunflowers are filled with vitality unlike any thing else I have ever known. Big sister Katherine and I gleaned 2112 seeds from a single sunflower blossom.  This fact burrowed into my being, planting its possibility in my veins.

To read the rest of the story, visit: Holistic Junction

To learn more about Julie Jordan Scott – www.5passions.com

The Language of Flowers thru the Ages





"Language of flowers through the ages"The language of Flowers started in Constantinople in the 1600s, and was brought to England in 1716 by Lady Mary Wortley Montague who had spent time in Turkey with her husband. The interest then moved to France (of course) where the Book Le Langage des Fleurs was printed with over 800 floral signs. Many were toned down in the English translation at the time of Queen Victoria because they were quite lusty and risque!

Flowers are part of our daily life. For virtually every event we have assigned a special flower. Flowers for love, church, church graveyard, marriage, etc. In the 16th century inn’s use to have a branch or flower stalk as signboard which later often changed only into the name of a specific tree or flower.  Many times one finds flower gardens in mythological sceneries.

The use of flowers is uncountable: attributes for the springtime, the youth, the sunrise, the rhetoric, the virtue etc.

Most people are aware that a red rose means love but did you know that almost every flower and sometimes the different colors of a single flower has its own meaning? Why is Stephanotis such a popular flower to use in wedding bouquets? Why put Bells of Ireland or Cattails in a bouquet for someone getting a new house or embarking on a new career?

Check out our Language of Flowers Chart (pdf, no optin) for the many different flowers and their meanings. This includes the more traditional meanings according to the original language of flowers.

Where did all those pretty flowers come from?





Wondering where all the pretty spring flowers come from?  Most of them come from the Dutch Flower Auctions and are shipped all over the world. Here’s a little bit about the Dutch Flower Auctions:

"Where did all those pretty flowers come from"The Dutch cut flower auctions form the distribution base for flowers and plants throughout the world. Their magnitude appeals to one’s imagination. The auctions have even become a major tourist attraction in Holland.

There is an endless stream of figures and facts designed to capture the magnitude of auctions. Here are interesting factual tidbits regarding the Dutch cut flower auctions in the world:

  • According to the Guinness Book of Records, the auction in Aalsmeer, the Netherlands is the largest commercial building in the world, comprising one million square meters. For that matter, the total floor space of the Flora Holland outlets equals 1,500,000 square meters or 16,145,865 square feet.
  • The Dutch auction at Naaldwijk has the largest floral cooling space in the world, measuring 43,000 square meters or 462,848 square feet – larger than 10 soccer fields combined. 
  • Over three-quarters of flowers and plants supplied to Dutch auctions are exported.
  • The auction clock was invented in Holland in 1902. The auction takes place by counting down from highest price to lowest price. The buyer stops the clock by pressing a button. If he is the first to press his button, he then purchases the flowers or plants being auctioned.
  • The auction in Aalsmeer draws more than 100,000 visitors annually.
  • At the auctions, the price of cut flowers is always a per stem price.
  • In 2006, Dutch auctions had combined sales of 3,975,400,000 euro – of which 2,500,400,000 euro for cut flowers.
  • Most Dutch cut flowers are exported to Germany, followed by the United Kingdom, France, Italy and Belgium.
  • At Dutch auctions, the most popular cut flowers sold are roses, chrysanthemums and tulips (in that order).
  • The export of cut flowers to Russia is the fastest growing (up 26% in 2006) export market for Dutch grown cut flowers.
  • Each year, the Dutch ornamental flower sector develops between 1,200 and 1,500 new flowers and plants.
  • Not all sales take place by the auction clock. The auctions also act as intermediary brokers between flower growers and buyers, without using the clock. This service started in 1972, and now makes up around one-fourth of total sales.
  • Dutch flower auctions use 12 million flower buckets and 800,000 flower boxes annually to get its flowers safely from the grower to the wholesaler.
  • Some 12,300 companies are involved in making deliveries to the Dutch auctions.

So next time you order spring flowers from your local florist, you have a little more insight into what goes into getting them from the earth to you!

Heidi

Be sure and order your next floral bouquet from Eden Florist.