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More Christmas Facts and Symbols


Here’s some more Christmas Facts, Symbols and History
christmasornament
Xmas
This abbreviation for Christmas is of Greek origin. The word for Christ in Greek is Xristos. During the 16th century, Europeans began using the first initial of Christ’s name, “X” in place of the word Christ in Christmas as a shorthand form of the word. Although the early Christians understood that X stood for Christ’s name, later Christians who did not understand the Greek language mistook “Xmas” as a sign of disrespect.

Read the Origins of Christmas here: http://www.edenflorist.com/article_info.php?articles_id=14

 

candycaneThe Candy Cane
Candy canes have been around for centuries, but it wasn’t until around 1900 that they were decorated with red stripes and bent into the shape of a cane. They were sometimes handed out during church services to keep the children quiet. One story (almost certainly false) that is often told about the origin of the candy cane is as follows:

In the late 1800’s a candy maker in Indiana wanted to express the meaning of Christmas through a symbol made of candy. He came up with the idea of bending one of his white candy sticks into the shape of a Candy Cane. He incorporated several symbols of Christ’s love and sacrifice through the Candy Cane. First, he used a plain white peppermint stick. The color white symbolizes the purity and sinless nature of Jesus. Next, he added three small stripes to symbolize the pain inflicted upon Jesus before His death on the cross. There are three of them to represent the Holy Trinity. He added a bold stripe to represent the blood Jesus shed for mankind. When looked at with the crook on top, it looks like a shepherd’s staff because Jesus is the shepherd of man. If you turn it upside down, it becomes the letter J symbolizing the first letter in Jesus’ name. The candy maker made these candy canes for Christmas, so everyone would remember what Christmas is all about.

Santa Claus
The original Santa Claus, St. Nicholas, was born in Turkey in the 4th century. He was very pious from an early age, devoting his life to Christianity. He became widely known for his generosity for the poor. But the Romans held him in contempt. He was imprisoned and tortured. But when Constantine became emperor of Rome, he allowed Nicholas to go free. Constantine became a Christian and convened the Council of Nicaea in 325. Nicholas was a delegate to the council. He is especially noted for his love of children and for his generosity. He is the patron saint of sailors, Sicily, Greece, and Russia. He is also, of course, the patron saint of children. The Dutch kept the legend of St. Nicholas alive. In 16th century Holland, Dutch children would place their wooden shoes by the hearth in hopes that they would be filled with a treat. The Dutch spelled St. Nicholas as Sint Nikolaas, which became corrupted to Sinterklaas, and finally, in Anglican, to Santa Claus. In 1822, Clement C. Moore composed his famous poem, “A Visit from St. Nick,” which was later published as “The Night Before Christmas.” Moore is credited with creating the modern image of Santa Claus as a jolly fat man in a red suit.

Read the History of Santa Claus here: http://www.edenflorist.com/article_info.php?articles_id=16

(source: http://wilstar.net/xmas/xmassymb.htm)

Order your holiday flowers at Eden Florist & Gift Baskets Online or by phone 954-981-5515 or 800-966-3336.

Christmas Facts and Symbols


mistletoe

Mistletoe and Holly
Two hundred years before the birth of Christ, the Druids used mistletoe to celebrate the coming of winter. They would gather this evergreen plant that is parasitic upon other trees and used it to decorate their homes. They believed the plant had special healing powers for everything from female infertility to poison ingestion. Scandinavians also thought of mistletoe as a plant of peace and harmony. They associated mistletoe with their goddess of love, Frigga. The custom of kissing under the mistletoe probably derived from this belief. The early church banned the use of mistletoe in Christmas celebrations because of its pagan origins. Instead, church fathers suggested the use of holly as an appropriate substitute for Christmas greenery.

Poinsettia

 

Poinsettias
Poinsettias are native to Mexico. They were named after America’s first ambassador to Mexico, Joel Poinsett. He brought the plants to America in 1828. The Mexicans in the eighteenth century thought the plants were symbolic of the Star of Bethlehem. Thus the Poinsettia became associated with the Christmas season. The actual flower of the poinsettia is small and yellow. But surrounding the flower are large, bright red leaves, often mistaken for petals.

 

The Christmas Tree
christmastreeThe Christmas Tree originated in Germany in the 16th century. It was common for the Germanic people to decorate fir trees, both inside and out, with roses, apples, and colored paper. It is believed that Martin Luther, the Protestant reformer, was the first to light a Christmas tree with candles. While coming home one dark winter’s night near Christmas, he was struck with the beauty of the starlight shining through the branches of a small fir tree outside his home. He duplicated the starlight by using candles attached to the branches of his indoor Christmas tree. The Christmas tree was not widely used in Britain until the 19th century. It was brought to America by the Pennsylvania Germans in the 1820’s.

Is there someone in your family that you just have trouble getting the right gift for? If so, check out Heidi’s Top Ten Gifts for the Hard to Please ~ http://www.edenflorist.com/article_info.php?articles_id=22

August Holidays Call for a Celebration


Anytime is the right time to send flowers! In fact, there are dozens of reasons (if you need more than one) to send flowers to someone special. For instance, did you know that August is Hug Month, Black Business Month and Romance Awareness Month?

If you need more ideas for sending flowers to the object of your affections, there are other holidays in August that are just perfect to do so.

They include: 

Single Working Women’s Week Aug. 2-8 (for the time-strapped woman), National Resurrect Romance Week Aug. 9-15 is a good time to bring back the romance, and Be Kind to Humankind Week Aug.  25-31 (know someone who needs a little pick-me-up)?

And lets not forget Happiness Happens Day Aug. 8 (just for the happiness of it), Eden Florist 28th Anniversary! Aug. 13 (that’s right, 28 GREAT YEARS) shared with National Left Handers Day Aug. 13 (even though only about 13% of the world population are lefties, I bet you know at least one left hander and they even have a national holiday all their own).

V-J Day Aug. 14  is the perfect time to honor a Veteran or your favorite service man or woman with flowers, Best Friends Day Aug. 15 (a great way to show how much you care), National Personal Chef’s Days Aug.18-20 (dinner, flowers and …?), Poets Day Aug. 21 (flowers have been the subject of prose since the dawn of time – so give a poet flowers to enjoy) , Kiss and Make Up Day Aug. 25 (if you or someone you know is in the Doghouse, flowers could be just the ticket out), Women’s Equality Day Aug.  26 (celebrate the women in your life with flowers) and Global Forgiveness Day Aug. 27 (is there someone in your part of the world that needs to be forgiven)?

Be sure and check out Eden Florist for a complete selection of flowers, plants, gourmet gift baskets and more.

Remember anytime is the right time to send flowers!

National Make Someone Smile Week Begins Today


“The man who can smile when things go wrong has thought of someone else he can blame it on.” ~ Robert Bloch

Did you know that today begins National Make Someone Smile WEEK (July 20-16? That’s right. And all across the country thousands of florists are delivering flowers to people in hospitals, nursing homes, and foster care centers to people who might not otherwise get any flowers.

Started in 2000 by Teleflora, it has become “the floral industry’s most successful charitable program. Last year’s program spanned 144 cities throughout the United States and Canada, more than 2,000 florists donated their time. Teleflora’s program delivered more than 35,000 bouquets to those most in need of a smile.”

Eden Florist will be participating in Make Someone Smile Week by dropping off flowers to my local library, favorite grocery store clerk and more.

Check out the article “How do you Make Someone Smile? Send Flowers, of course!”   It’s my list of  21 people and places to send a smile and get on in return.  and be sure to visit: EdenFlorist.com to send flowers to someone who needs a lift.

And when you give a smile, it is almost impossible not to get one in return! And wouldn’t it be nice to be “blamed” for doing something good (for a change)? *SMILE

So keep smiling! And be sure to send someone flowers to make them smile too!  It could be a total stranger or someone you love. Its up to you.

Feel free to leave your LIST of people you would like to make smile in the comments section below. If we get enough response, I may even have a contest and give free flowers to the writer AND the person she/he wishes to send flowers. How about that to make someone smile?

Happy Make Someone Smile Week!

Thanksgiving Fun for the Family


This is one of my favorites and I am going to use this one of these days…. It is an old tradition that is delightful and inspiring. As you read it picture yourself around a table at the first thanksgiving. What would you be thankful for back then?

THE TALKING FORKtalkingfork
This old storytelling game has been around forever, but it just might do the trick when the kids have cleaned their plates and are ready to fly out the door again. Just ask: “Did everybody use a fork?”  They’ll all nod.

“Good. If you just used a fork, then you owe the cook a magic memory. I will now unveil The Talking Fork.”  Puzzled looks will follow.  “I cooked this meal. And before we all leave, I want to hear some good, fun, magic family memories. Here’s the Talking Fork. I’ll go first.” Then pick up a fork around which you’ve tied a ribbon — a nice, big serving fork is good for dramatic effect — and begin.  Source: Family Education.com

HAPPY PUMPKINS

happypumpkins
Another fun activity for family members of all ages is the Happy Pumpkins.  You will need one miniature pumpkin per guest and several “magic markers.”

Ask each guest to decorate their pumpkin to reflect their mood, personality or creative nature.  Use these as a centerpiece for the desert table.

And here’s another Thanksgiving activity that is sure to bring a smile to your guests faces:

Picture Perfect Thanksgiving https://tulipstalk.com/picture-perfect-thanksgiving/

There’s still time to order  flowers for  your Thanksgiving  table from Eden Florist. Visit our Website www.EDENFLORIST.com or call 800-966-3336 (EDEN) today!

What do You do on Thanksgiving Day?


Thanksgiving is just around the corner. Thanksgiving, a time of family, laughter, gratitude and joy.

Thanksgiving is and always has been my favorite holiday. It is so unpretentious. No worrying about if you got the right gift for Uncle Mike or Aunt Martha.  You don’t have to spend hours or even days decorating the house. Everything on thanksgiving revolves around sharing and caring and the dinner table.

In fact, I spend more time planning the activities for Thanksgiving than I do for most vacations.

Every year when I host Thanksgiving dinner I  like to incorporate some sort of “activity” into the meal.  Over the next few days I am going to share a few of the activities we have done in our home and also some that my customers and readers have shared with me. I will also link to some of the ones we have posted over the years. If you have a special activity or tradition you’d like to share, feel free to leave it in the comments section below.  I’d love to hear from you.

If you prefer, you can send your idea to heidi @ edenflorist.com with “Thanksgiving Traditions” in the subject line.

Here’s one that was sent to me by Kimberly Glenn:

The Thanksgiving Tree

THANKSGIVINGTREE

A few years ago, I sent out a note a few weeks before Thanksgiving asking that each person send me a list of things they appreciated about other members of our extended family.  (We have 50-75 people for Thanksgiving!) I printed them on construction paper leaves and made a Thanksgiving tree that was displayed at the front of our large room.  It was such a blessing to read all of the nice things about others as well as myself.  I made sure that every member of the family had at least 3-4 leaves describing why people were thankful for them.  There were many laughs and tears as we remembered why we love each other so much!

And here’s a couple of Thanksgiving posts from last year that you may find of interest:

Giving Thanks Around the world https://tulipstalk.com/giving-thanks-around-the-world/

Scrolls of Thanks https://tulipstalk.com/scroll-down-for-thanksgiving-activity/

Thers’s still time to order  flowers for  your Thanksgiving  table from Eden Florist. Visit our Website www.EDENFLORIST.com or call 800-966-3336 (EDEN) today!