Flower Study Unearths Buyers Generational Preferences


The Society of American Florists conducted research to find out what flowers “mean” to different generations. Here’s an excerpt of that study:

“SAF’s Generations of Flowers consumer research study, completed in January 2009, explores the motivations and barriers of how different age groups perceive, buy, and use flowers and floral outlets. Three generations of consumers were assessed through qualitative and quantitative measures: Generation Y (ages 18-30), Generation X (31-44), and Baby Boomers (45-60). The study methodology included:

Interviews with generational and gift giving research giants, Iconoculture and Roper
Two online focus groups of 57 individuals
Online survey of 1,557 flower consumers”

Key Inisghts Included Flowers and Gifting, Flower Purchase Behaviors and compared Boomers, Gen X’ers and Gen Y feelings toward flowers in general.

For instance when it comes to floral purchases

Gen Y is “most likely to purchase flowers in person and deliver flowers themselves. This echoes a “personalization” trend in gifting characteristic of this generation.”

And Gen Y is also “more likely to purchase flowers to impress guests in their home, significantly higher than other generations. This indicates an opportunity to reposition the value of flowers for the younger consumer.”

Compared to Gen X which “most likely purchases flowers as a traditional holiday/occasion gift for someone else, as a “just because” pick-me-up gift, and for home decoration.”

The Baby Boomer Generation “is significantly more likely than other generations to keep flowers in their consideration set when purchasing a gift, and to find flowers appropriate for a broad range of gifting situations.”

To read the rest of the study visit http://www.canadiangardencentre.ca/content/view/2017/38/

To order flowers visit: Eden Florist Today!

Today is Administrative Professionals Day


"Gerbera Greetings for Secretaries Day"This annual event was originally organized in 1952 as “National Secretaries Week” by the National Secretaries Association (now known as the International Association of Administrative Professionals) in conjunction with public relations executive Harry Klemfuss and a consortium of office product manufacturers. It was established as an effort to recognize secretaries for their contributions in the workplace, and to attract people to secretarial/administrative careers. 

In the year 2000, IAAP announced a name change for Professional Secretaries Week and Professional Secretaries Day. The names were changed to Administrative Professionals Week and Administrative Professionals Day to keep pace with changing job titles and expanding responsibilities of today’s administrative workforce.

Over the years, Administrative Professionals Week has become one of the largest workplace observances. The event is celebrated worldwide, bringing together millions of people for community events, educational seminars, and individual corporate activities recognizing support staff with gifts of appreciation.

Today, there are more than 4.1 million secretaries and administrative assistants working in the United States, according to U.S. Department of Labor statistics, and 8.9 million people working in various administrative support roles. More than 475,000 administrative professionals are employed in Canada. Millions more administrative professionals work in offices all over the world.

Remember: there’s still time to order flowers for your assistant. Just give Eden Florist a call at 954-981-5515 or visit our website at www.EdenFlorist.com.

Spring Equinox – First Day of Spring


"Spring Equinox"

Spring

Spring makes the world a happy place
You see a smile on every face.
Flowers come out and birds arrive,
Oh, isn’t it grand to be alive?

Spring is one of the four seasons of temperate zones. Astronomically, it begins with the spring equinox (begins today – March 20 in the Northern Hemisphere, and around September 23 in the Southern Hemisphere), and ends with the summer solstice (around June 21 in the Northern Hemisphere and December 21 in the Southern Hemisphere). In meteorology, it is by convention instead counted as the whole months of March, April, and May in the Northern Hemisphere and September, October, and November in the Southern Hemisphere. However, in the Irish Calendar it is counted as the whole months of February, March and April.

Spring, Almost

The sunshine gleams so bright and warm,
The sky is blue and clear.
I run outdoors without a coat,
And spring is almost here.

Then before I know it,
Small clouds have blown together,
Till the sun just can’t get through them,
And again, it’s mitten weather.

April

April is a rainbow month,
Of sudden springtime showers.
Bright with golden daffodils
and lots of pretty flowers
.

Click here to download our Easter Coloring Book

Click here to download our Passover Coloring Book

Click here to Order FLOWERS

Valentines Day Traditions Around the World


Valentines Day Traditions Around the World

Valentines Traditions Around the World"In Austria it has become customary for a young man to present his loved one with a bunch of flowers for Valentine’s Day.

In Australia during the gold rush, miners who were flushed with new found wealth paid high prices for elaborate valentines. The most extravagant of valentines were made of a satin cushion, perfumed, ornately designed with flowers, colored shells and a taxidermied humming bird or bird of paradise. 

In Britain some unmarried women get up before sunrise on Valentine’s Day. They stand by the window watching for a man to pass. They believe that the first man they see, or someone who looks like him, will marry them within a year.In Denmark people press white flowers called snowdrops and send them to their friends. Danish men send a type of valentine called a gaekkebrev (joking letter). The sender writes a rhyme but does not sign his name. Instead, he signs the valentine with dots, one dot for each letter of his name. If the woman who gets it guesses his name, he rewards her with an Easter egg on Easter. 

In 18th century England unmarried women would pin bay leaves to their pillow on Valentine’s Day in the hope of dreaming of their future husband. Others baked valentine buns with caraway seeds, plums or raisins. 

Remember to order flowers for your VALENTINE EARLY!

(pictured – Pretty Pink Elegance)

Ethnic Guidelines for Sympathy Flowers


"Ethnic Guidelines for Sympathy Flowers"Have no idea which flowers are most accepted in certain cultures and religions? Then you’ve come to the right place.  this list will help you choose the perfect tribute to express your sympathy and love. Listed below are the types of flowers which are preferred, which to avoid (if any) and where the final tribute is customarily sent.

African

Religious Affiliation if any: Christian, Muslim, others

Types of flowers preferred are roses, carnations, lilies and tropical exotic bouquets

Color preferences or prohibitions for flowers: none

Where are the flowers customarily sent?  To the funeral home for Christian services and to the home for those of Muslim faith.

Arab

Religious Affiliation if any: Christian, Muslim, others

Types of flowers preferred are roses and carnations, 

Color preferences or prohibitions for flowers: none

Where are the flowers customarily sent?  To the funeral home for Christian services and to the home for those of Muslim faith.

Asian

Religious Affiliation if any: Buddhist, Christian, Muslim, others

Types of flowers preferred are chrysanthemums, lilies, orchids and gladioulas or stalk-like flowers (such as snapdragons and larkspur).

Color preferences or prohibitions for flowers: Chinese avoid red. Koreans prefer white and light yellow

Where are the flowers customarily sent?  To the funeral home for Buddhist and Christian services and to the home for those of Muslim faith.

Chaldean

Religious Affiliation if any: Christian (primarily Roman Catholic)

Types of flowers preferred are roses, carnations and lilies 

Color preferences or prohibitions for flowers: Red symbolizes love and loss; white flowers are used at children’s funeral services.

Where are the flowers customarily sent?  To the funeral home

Jewish

Religious Affiliation if any: Jewish

Types of flowers preferred are roses, snapdragons or gladioulas orchids and tropicals

Color preferences or prohibitions for flowers: none

Where are the flowers customarily sent?  To the home.

Hispanic

Religious Affiliation if any: Christian (primarily Roman Catholic) and others

Types of flowers preferred are roses, carnations, snapdragons or gladioulas orchids and tropicals

Color preferences or prohibitions for flowers: none

Where are the flowers customarily sent?  To the funeral home.

See also Funeral Flowers and Religion 

Find out more at Sympathy Etiquette FAQ’s

 

Note: this article was originally posted in January 2008. We decided it was one our readers would appreciate re-reading…

Thanksgiving Myths and FACTS


"Thanksgiving Myths and FACTS"Mayflower Myths

The reason that we have so many myths associated with Thanksgiving is that it is an invented tradition. It doesn’t originate in any one event. It is based on the New England puritan Thanksgiving, which is a religious Thanksgiving, and the traditional harvest celebrations of England and New England and maybe other ideas like commemorating the pilgrims. All of these have been gathered together and transformed into something different from the original parts.

Myth:

The first Thanksgiving was in 1621 and the pilgrims celebrated it every year thereafter.

Fact:

The first feast wasn’t repeated, so it wasn’t the beginning of a tradition. In fact, the colonists didn’t even call the day Thanksgiving. To them, a thanksgiving was a religious holiday in which they would go to church and thank God for a specific event, such as the winning of a battle. On such a religious day, the types of recreational activities that the pilgrims and Wampanoag Indians participated in during the 1621 harvest feast–dancing, singing secular songs, playing games–wouldn’t have been allowed. The feast was a secular celebration, so it never would have been considered a thanksgiving in the pilgrims minds.

Myth:

The original Thanksgiving feast took place on the fourth Thursday of November.

Fact:

The original feast in 1621 occurred sometime between September 21 and November 11. Unlike our modern holiday, it was three days long. The event was based on English harvest festivals, which traditionally occurred around the 29th of September. After that first harvest was completed by the Plymouth colonists, Gov. William Bradford proclaimed a day of thanksgiving and prayer, shared by all the colonists and neighboring Indians. In 1623 a day of fasting and prayer during a period of drought was changed to one of thanksgiving because the rain came during the prayers. Gradually the custom prevailed in New England of annually celebrating thanksgiving after the harvest.

During the American Revolution a yearly day of national thanksgiving was suggested by the Continental Congress. In 1817 New York State adopted Thanksgiving Day as an annual custom, and by the middle of the 19th century many other states had done the same. In 1863 President Abraham Lincoln appointed a day of thanksgiving as the last Thursday in November, which he may have correlated it with the November 21, 1621, anchoring of the Mayflower at Cape Cod. Since then, each president has issued a Thanksgiving Day Proclamation. President Franklin D. Roosevelt set the date for Thanksgiving to the fourth Thursday of November in 1939 (approved by Congress in 1941).

Myth:

The pilgrims wore only black and white clothing. They had buckles on their hats, garments, and shoes.

Fact:

Buckles did not come into fashion until later in the seventeenth century and black and white were commonly worn only on Sunday and formal occasions. Women typically dressed in red, earthy green, brown, blue, violet, and gray, while men wore clothing in white, beige, black, earthy green, and brown.

Myth:

The pilgrims brought furniture with them on the Mayflower.

Fact:

The only furniture that the pilgrims brought on the Mayflower was chests and boxes. They constructed wooden furniture once they settled in Plymouth.

Myth:

The Mayflower was headed for Virginia, but due to a navigational mistake it ended up in Cape Cod Massachusetts.

Fact:

The Pilgrims were in fact planning to settle in Virginia, but not the modern-day state of Virginia. They were part of the Virginia Company, which had the rights to most of the eastern seaboard of the U.S. The pilgrims had intended to go to the Hudson River region in New York State, which would have been considered “Northern Virginia,” but they landed in Cape Cod instead. Treacherous seas prevented them from venturing further south.

(adapted from the History Channel)

Only a few days left to order flowers for your Thanksgiving table. Be sure to send flowers to your family and the host of your family dinner . Call Eden Florist at 954-981-5515 or order online at EdenFlorist.com